Gepids


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Gepids

 

a group of Germanic tribes related to the Goths. In the second century the Gepids migrated from Scandinavia to the eastern shores of the Baltic Sea. Toward the end of the second century, they followed the Goths to the southeast. In the late fourth century they joined the tribal alliance of the Huns. In the latter half of the sixth century they were conquered by the combined forces of the Lombards and the Avars. The Gepids were mentioned for the last time in the ninth century.

References in periodicals archive ?
However, similar results were obtained by examining the 5th century gold artefacts, found in the burial grounds and treasures on the higher reaches of the Dnieper, the Crimean Goths, the Gepids of the middle reaches of the Danube, and, naturally, of Huns (e.
Evidently, small multiethnic groups of aliens that could have included Heruls, Gepids, and Ostrogoths, reached east Lithuania and managed to get established there (Zabiela 1995, 47 ff.
In the course of his discourse, Guitmund uses exempla from the Bible, ancient Persia and Babylonia, Greece and Troy, Macedonia, the Romans, the Franks and Anglo-Saxons, the Gepids, Goths, Vandals, Turks, Huns and Heruli
the country was ravaged by a succession of migratory populations (Goths, Huns, Gepids, Avars).
They include the backcountry Balts (Aesti) and the Northern Gold in late antiquity and the early Middle Ages, a Hun-age burial with male skeleton and horse bones found in Budapest, archaeological evidence for Gepids in the Balkans, the Justinianic Hercules from allied barbarians to Roman provincials, the Visigoth connection to Suevic coins and kings 418-456, and the Vandal's path to an African kingdom.
Aetius, alarmed at these developments, knew that his legions could not hope to defend Rome against the combined might of the Hunnic horde and the host of Germanic allies--the Gepids, Alans, Ostrogoths, and Burgundians among them--marching under Attila's standard.
As the two vast armies encamped and began probing each others' weaknesses, a "skirmish" occurred--between Attila's Gepids and Aetius' Franks--in which roughly 15,000 lives were lost, casting some perspective on the scale of the greater battle to come.
These included the Visigoths, Ostrogoths, Gepids, Avars, Alans, Vandals, Sueves, various Germanic and Slavic tribes, Lombards, Huns, Bulgars, Franks, Moravians and eventually the Magyars.
I thought about the Gepids as I drove through the Navajo Reservation in Arizona and New Mexico through incomparable scenery, a lot of history, and often uncomfortable knowledge about the present, much of it filtered through the novels of fellow Oklahomans, Tony Hillerman and Ron Querry.
And that brings me back to the Gepids and the question in the title.
The cemetery theme continues with Radu Harhoiu's research into the disappearance of the Gepids.
The final chapter models barbarian history by tracing the individual careers of a 'medley' of peoples: the Gepids, the Sciri, the Herules, the Spanish Sueves, the Frisians, the Thuringians, and the Bavarians.