Giraldus Cambrensis

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Giraldus Cambrensis

(jĭrăl`dəs kămbrĕn`sĭs), c.1146–1223, Norman-Welsh churchman and historian, also called Gerald of Wales and Gerald de Barri. He was associated (from 1184) with the king and court of England. His historical works include two descriptive works on Ireland (resulting from a visit) and Descriptio Cambriae [description of Wales]. They contain rare glimpses of medieval life and folklore. He also wrote autobiographical works, lives of churchmen, pastoral admonitions, Latin poetry, and treatises on the rights of the see of St. David's.

Bibliography

See his autobiography (ed. and tr. by H. E. Butler, 1937); biography by R. Bartlett (1982).

Giraldus Cambrensis

literary name of Gerald de Barri. ?1146--?1223, Welsh chronicler and churchman, noted for his accounts of his travels in Ireland and Wales
References in periodicals archive ?
Geraldus Cambrensis, a writer and explorer, noted in 1193 that the Welsh people "in their musical concerts do not sing in unison like the inhabitants of other countries, but in many different parts.
Geraldus Cambrensis, that great chronicler of the late 12th and early 13th centuries, once recounted the story of a particularly brutal French Castellan, who oversaw the south-east borders of Wales, and who said that one sure way to keep the Welsh down, was to ride into a village a give them a few sheep.
SOME 800 years ago Geraldus Cambrensis recorded the last indigenous beavers living in Wales.