germline

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germline

[′jərm ‚līn]
(biology)
A lineage of cells from which gametes are derived. Also known as germ track.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Considering preimplantation embryos as human beings would halt any scientific studies and development of such biologic possibilities as germ-line gene and embryonic stem cell therapies and therapeutic cloning.
Let's step back, and consider the germ-line DNA of our species and its most immediate ancestors.
Nagano et al., "Transgenic Mice Produced by Retroviral Transduction of Male Germ-Line Stem Cells," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 98 (2001): 13090-13095.
Germ-line engineering may well be impossible; the scientific jury is still out.
"It is imperative that the scientists responsible for this work fully explain their break from the global consensus that application of CRISPR-Cas9 for human germ-line editing should not proceed at the present time," she said in a statement distributed by UC Berkeley.
While considering urgent a broad and informed public debate on the subject, the parliamentarians underlined that deliberate germ-line editing in human beings crosses a line viewed as ethically inviolable by the Parliamentary Assembly.
Renal carcinoma with giant mitochondria associated with germ-line mutation and somatic loss of the succinate dehydrogenase B gene.
The controversial procedure, known as "germ-line editing," was conducted at Oregon Health & Science University using human embryos expressly created for the purpose.
Efficient genetic modification and germ-line transmission of primordial germ cells using piggyBac and Tol2 transposons.
ERVs are relics of past infections, resulting from viral genomic integrations that occur in host germ-line cells, and are in turn passed down from parents to offspring as part of the host genome," the researchers wrote in the study.
The most important conclusions of the event were the need to establish legal, ethical and follow up standards for basic and preclinical research on human gene expression, and the use of the technique in somatic cells for clinical applications; and with some restrictions, in germ-line cells or embryos, at least until sufficient information is obtained on the safety and efficacy of the same.
PFTC has been described in high-risk breast-ovarian cancer families with germ-line BRCA-1 and BRCA-2 mutations.