Deutschmark

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Deutschmark

, Deutsche Mark
the former standard monetary unit of Germany, divided into 100 pfennigs; replaced by the euro in 2002: until 1990 the standard monetary unit of West Germany
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Today German marks are travel souvenirs, bits of history forgotten at the back of a drawer or still stashed in safety deposit boxes.
In line with the Mars hypothesis, the share of German marks in the Austro-Hungarian Empire's reserves increased with the strengthening of the Triple Alliance, the secret pact the empire signed with Germany and Italy in 1882.
But euro defenders argue that Germany's export sector, a key driver of growth in recent years, has benefited from the common currency by making its products more competitive abroad than they would have been with a stronger German mark.
"The cost was one shilling (5p) per pack of 20 and the going rate for selling to the local Germans was one German Mark for a 20 pack.
1923: As the German mark collapsed, pounds 1 was equal to 600 million marks.
19), such as exchanging the East German mark one to one for the West German mark (which implied an appreciation of the East German mark by some 400 percent), thus triggering unrealistic expectations that fed into excessive wage demands.
Although the euro is at record levels, he described its strength as not "unprecedented" when taking into account the strength of predecessors such as the German mark and the French franc in the early 1980s.
The 98-year-old hotel, which has played host to Japanese and other world leaders, movie stars, writers, architects and the Beatles among others, is largely associated with the famous ''Plaza Accord,'' which in 1985 dramatically drove down the value of the dollar against the Japanese yen and the German mark and helped avert a global financial crisis.
A brief, accurate translation of Bernanke's remarks, noted New York Post economics writer John Crudele, is, "we'll just print more money if the economy doesn't respond to traditional remedies." But while Bernanke insists that the government can print new money "at essentially no cost," Crudele supplies the historical context that the Fed governor artfully avoided: "The printing press image is a hot button with economists because that's exactly what the Germans did in the 1920s when that country was faced with huge budget deficits because of World War I." The resulting hyperinflation obliterated the German mark's value, leading to the imperishable image of German citizens having to drag wheelbarrows full of money to stores to buy a day's worth of groceries.
The ANN model is used to forecast the 90-day future spot rate for three currencies: the British pound, the German mark, and the Swiss franc.