German measles


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Related to German measles: roseola

rubella

rubella or German measles, acute infectious disease of children and young adults. It is caused by a filterable virus that is spread by droplet spray from the respiratory tract of an infected individual. Rubella is a much milder infection than rubeola (measles) and the rash, appearing after an incubation period of two to three weeks, rarely lasts more than three days. The lymph nodes behind the ears become tender and swollen, but otherwise German measles is almost always uncomplicated. However, during the first trimester of pregnancy it is associated with an increased risk of congenital damage to the fetus, producing stillbirths, abortion, low birth weight, and such malformations as cardiac defects, eye defects (especially cataracts), and mental retardation. During the first 16 weeks of pregnancy the infection has been estimated to carry a risk of fetal damage of between 30% and 35%. Pregnant women who have been exposed to rubella are given gamma globulin in an effort to prevent the disease. Research to develop a vaccine that would confer immunity was spurred by an epidemic of rubella in 1964 and the evidently related rise in the number of birth deformities. A live attenuated vaccine has been developed and is given to girls from 15 months to puberty and often to boys as well. Approximately 13% to 15% of women develop acute arthitis from vaccination. Before the vaccine can be administered to an adult woman it must be determined that she is not pregnant, and the test for the presence of rubella antibodies (which would indicate immunity to the disease from previous exposure) is given. Birth control should be practiced for at least three months after receiving the vaccine. Vaccination has eliminated endemic rubella in the Western Hemisphere.
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German measles

[¦jər·mən ′mē·zəlz]
(medicine)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the drug, known by the acronym DRACO, is also expected to zap measles and German measles, cold sores, rabies and even HIV - and could be on pharmacy shelves in a decade.
annually Hemisphere Hib meningitis 600 +++++10 deaths/year in deaths/year children Whooping cough 9,000 57 deaths deaths/year from 1990-1996 Rubella Epidemic of 6 in 2000 20,000 cases in (German measles) 1964-65 Diphtheria 206,000 2 in 2001 cases/year in 1921 Mumps 212,000 cases 266 in 2001 in 1964 http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/programs/vfc/
The next day I contracted German measles and a few days later, lying in bed at 22 Moscow Drive a bomb was dropped in Uppingham Road nearby.
Khartoum : The SPLM deputies refuse to leave the parliament in return for three months pay - Agreement to establish major investment projects in Sinnar town - 500 new buses for Khartoum State's Transport Company - Appearance of some cases of German measles in random gold mining areas in River Nile State
"The vaccine is also important as it protects against mumps and rubella (German measles) and unvaccinated children remain at risk of catching these diseases as well.
There is no known cause although if a mother has had German measles it could be linked.
Wolpert delves into the details of DNA and other genetic material, contrasting complicated networks (each human cell houses about 30000 genes) with simpler ones (the German measles virus has just three genes).
ANSWERS: 1 The tambourine; 2 Pelota; 3 Alaska; 4 Faust; 5 Robert Kennedy; 6 Lord Protector; 7 Patsy Kensit; 8 Fish; 9 German measles; 10 Hispaniola.
Measles and German measles vaccines will be given to people age 1 to 19; children up to age 4 will receive immunization against polio.
Mumps is a severe swelling of the salivary glands, while rubella, also called German measles, is also caused by a virus that is spread from person to person.
Addressing the 3-day meeting on combating measles and German measles, Kharabsheh said Jordan had reduced the rate of infant mortality through the immunization program, which has been launched in 1979.
Rubella - also called German measles - can cause miscarriages and eye, hearing and heart problems in babies.