Gervase of Canterbury


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Gervase of Canterbury

(jûr`vāz, jərvāz`), d. c.1210, English chronicler. A monk of Christ Church, Cambridge, he wrote an account of the reigns of Stephen, Henry II, and Richard I. His Chronica is an ecclesiastical history of Canterbury, the Gesta regum a history of the kings of England into the reign of John. Gervase was noted for his discriminating choice of facts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Here we can observe how admirably scrupulous Thucydides was in his methodology, listen to Gervase of Canterbury on the gulf fixed between the accomplished historian and the pedestrian chronicler, eavesdrop on Dr Johnson's curt put-down of the historical profession, ponder on Paul Valery's disturbing judgement that 'History is the most dangerous substance that the chemistry of the intellect has created'.
In his chronicles of medieval life, Gervase of Canterbury described a dramatic event witnessed by a group of people on the evening of June 18, 1178:
Advocates of Taurid danger attribute Chinese records of alleged intermittent Taurid enhancement, the bizarre lunar event reported for June 1178 by Gervase of Canterbury, the dramatic Tunguska impact on June 30, 1908, and an impressive meteoritic bombardment detected by seismic sensors on the Moon in June 1975 to this same herd of trouble.