Boulogne-sur-Mer

(redirected from Gesoriacum)

Boulogne-sur-Mer

(bo͞olô`nyə-sür-mĕr`), city (1990 pop. 44,244), Pas-de-Calais dept., N France, in Picardy, on the English Channel. A commercial seaport and the leading fishing port of France, it has canning and shipbuilding industries. It is an important ferry port between France and England. The opening of the Channel TunnelChannel Tunnel,
popularly called the "Chunnel," a three-tunnel railroad connection running under the English Channel, connecting Folkestone, England, and Calais, France. The tunnels are 31 mi (50 km) long. There are two rail tunnels, each 25 ft (7.
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 at nearby Coquelles, France may have an impact on the city's ferry services and industries. From there the Romans sailed (A.D. 43) to conquer Britain, and there again Napoleon assembled an invasion fleet (which never sailed) in 1803–5. The port was a main base for British armies in World War I and a German submarine base in World War II. Most of the city was destroyed during the latter conflict. The Cathedral of Notre Dame (built 19th cent.; damaged 1941; since restored) is a great shrine of pilgrimage; it stands on a site where miracles were believed to have occurred in the 7th cent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aurelius Carausius in Britain (293-294); captured Carausius' mainland base at Gesoriacum (Boulogne) (autumn 293), and carefully prepared for the invasion of Britain (293-296); invaded Britain, landing his forces near modern Southampton, defeated the poorly led army of Carausius' successor Alectus, and captured London (April-June 296); won a notable victory over the Alamanni in Gaul (298), but was lax in enforcing Diocletian's edicts against Christians, and confined himself to destroying churches (303); became senior Augustus when Maximian and Diocletian abdicated (May 1, 305); died at Eboracum (York) (summer 306), succeeded by his eldest son Constantine.