William of Malmesbury

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William of Malmesbury

(mämz`bərē), c.1096–1143, English writer, monk of Malmesbury. His most important work is the Gesta regum Anglorum, a history of the kings of England from 449 to 1127, with its continuation, Historia novella (ed. by William Stubbs, 1887–89). Book V is contemporary history, especially valuable for the reigns of Henry I and Stephen. The work appeared in English as The Chronicle of the Kings of England (see ed. by J. A. Giles, 1847, repr. 1968). He also wrote Gesta pontificum Anglorum, a source for early ecclesiastical history and for several saints' lives.
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The manuscript contains two texts, both of which are incomplete: Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae and William of Malmesbury's Gesta Regum Anglorum. This combination is fairly rare, as only seven known manuscripts contain both texts, and only two constitute twelfth-century witnesses of such compilation practices.
As Griscom's manuscript ends close to the end of Book III of William of Malmesbury's Gesta, Griscom puts forth a fairly safe claim that at the time of rebinding, the manuscript terminated at the end of Book III, without completing the text of Gesta Regum Anglorum to the end of Book V.
Moreover, the text of the Columbia fragment picks up exactly where the extant manuscript terminates, namely at section 277 of Book III of Gesta Regum Anglorum: "[decorated red "P" with blue filigree]atris memoria(m) quantis pot(er)at/ occasionib(us) extollens, ossa oli(m)/ nicee [Niceae] condita sub extremo vi-/ te te(m)p(or)e p(er) legatu(m) transferebat." (31) Because the manuscript and the loose leaf are located in different libraries, a transposition method was used to compare the visible damage.
In Book III of his Gesta Regum Anglorum William of Malmesbury includes a fairly extensive section dealing with the First Crusade and its aftermath.
Both Orderic, in his Ecclesiastical History, and William, in his Gesta Regum Anglorum, though working to some extent far from the major centres of action in their world (Malmesbury and St Evroult abbeys), nevertheless displayed great keenness to learn from the history of their larger environments, English in the case of William, and Norman in the case of Orderic.
For William, one must start with William of Malmesbury 'Gesta Regum Anglorum', trans.
Haruko Momma's essay considers the representation of other languages in Latin in William of Malmesbury's Gesta regum Anglorum and questions the implications of this linguistic flattening for medieval readers.