Gestalt theory


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Gestalt theory

a theory developed by the Frankfurt school of psychologists in the early 20th-century, which emphasized the organization and meaning imposed on sensory data during the process of perception. An often quoted summary of Gestalt theory (Gestalt = whole or pattern) is the phrase ‘the whole is more than the sum of the parts’. General laws of perceptual organization were described (e.g. proximity similarity, law ofPrägnanz or ‘good form’), and a now highly dubious account of corresponding brain action proposed, in which percepts were represented by stability in cortical field patterns. Gestalt psychologists (e.g. Kurt Koffka, Wolfgang Köhler and Max Wertheimer) also believed perceptual organization to be innate (see NATURE-NURTURE DEBATE). Today, only the descriptive level of Gestalt theory finds general acceptance.
References in periodicals archive ?
This difference is compatible with the principle I adopted from gestalt theory, that the whole is a system that determines the character of its parts.
Our intention was not to suggest that a Gestalt approach is necessarily better than any other approach to counseling men, but it was to help counselors already interested in Gestalt theory better use their skills to effectively work with male clients.
From Gestalt theory to image analysis: a probabilistic approach", Springer, 2008.
Abrantes considers the emergence and significance of gestalt theory in the research of perception form.
Combining these areas brings a blend of clinical practice, Gestalt theory, clinical supervision, and experiential foci, the very essence of our model.
To describe the human visual perception, Wertheimer provided some principles under its Gestalt Theory (Wertheimer, 1923a;b; Koffka, 1935; Rock, 2001).
Gestalt Theory, Available from: http://gestalttheory.
Grouping by proximity and multistability in dot lattices: A quantitative Gestalt theory.
Cognitive semantics proposes a paradigm that revives theories of descriptive psychology developed at the beginning of this century: Gestalt theory and experimentation (see Lakoft, 1977).
Although the primary emphasis, here, is placed on the intriguing parallels between DPM and Gestalt theory (Perls, 1969), mental health counselors identifying with a behavioral (Wilson, 2000), person-centered (Rogers, 1980), or Jungian (Douglas, 2000) framework may find DPM concepts useful in their work with bereaved clients.
In another study on coauthorship, Kretschmer applies gestalt theory from psychology to the similarities and dissimilarities of authors to each other based on counts of the number of papers coauthored.
Gestalt theory provides the third argument since this theory stresses the significance of perceptual processes in problem solving and in other tasks requiring higher mental functioning.