Gestalt theory


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Gestalt theory

a theory developed by the Frankfurt school of psychologists in the early 20th-century, which emphasized the organization and meaning imposed on sensory data during the process of perception. An often quoted summary of Gestalt theory (Gestalt = whole or pattern) is the phrase ‘the whole is more than the sum of the parts’. General laws of perceptual organization were described (e.g. proximity similarity, law ofPrägnanz or ‘good form’), and a now highly dubious account of corresponding brain action proposed, in which percepts were represented by stability in cortical field patterns. Gestalt psychologists (e.g. Kurt Koffka, Wolfgang Köhler and Max Wertheimer) also believed perceptual organization to be innate (see NATURE-NURTURE DEBATE). Today, only the descriptive level of Gestalt theory finds general acceptance.
References in periodicals archive ?
This difference is compatible with the principle I adopted from gestalt theory, that the whole is a system that determines the character of its parts.
Gestalt theory refers to the visual phenomena of the objects seen, such as grouping and symmetry.
Another strong connection between DPM and Gestalt theory is the attention given by both to dualism and oscillation.
In another study on coauthorship, Kretschmer applies gestalt theory from psychology to the similarities and dissimilarities of authors to each other based on counts of the number of papers coauthored.
In an effort to provide a more robust means of examining organizational behaviors and relationships, several researchers have proposed the application of gestalt theory.
The discussion of "seeing" and seeing as,, is continued in chapter 6, which treats of Kohler's influence on Wittgenstein and Wittgenstein's interest in and objections to Kohler's gestalt theory.