action painting

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action painting:

see abstract expressionismabstract expressionism,
movement of abstract painting that emerged in New York City during the mid-1940s and attained singular prominence in American art in the following decade; also called action painting and the New York school.
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action painting

a development of abstract expressionism evolved in the 1940s, characterized by broad vigorous brush strokes and accidental effects of thrown, smeared, dripped, or spattered paint
References in periodicals archive ?
Clearly nettled by dismissals of his work compared with the more gestural paintings of his time, Newman stood his ground as early as 1958 when he remarked, "My work, they claim, is antipainting, when what they mean is that it is antitechnique, antibrushwork and that the large open areas I use require, as the restorers of my work are beginning to realize, the highest artistry.
Color and texture come together in the broad color field planes in which Bacon sets his figures, confirming that his paintings are essentially abstract--for the figures also are abstract signifiers of pure gestural painting, however "meaty.
Both focus on the horrified face of the protagonist and on some indefinite striking motions, no doubt a weapon being swung (though one might also think of gestural painting here).
At Praxes, where works were presented in several changing constellations over three and a half months (according to the operative principle of the place), the artist alternately showed her signature gestural paintings or sculptures made of transparent resin and bejeweled bling alongside mirrored panels, the last in particular making viewing a literal act of self-reflection.
HOUSTON, May 15, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Asia Society Texas Center will host a major exhibition of the work of Tawara Yusaku (1932-2004), a Japanese artist whose evocative gestural paintings convey the world as unstable and constantly changing.
There are several enormous canvases that appear to be abstract compositions but are in fact boisterous, gestural paintings of crowds pouring through deconstructed urban landscapes.
On others, allover and violently gestural paintings cover the blue screens of death that once told you your cable was Out or that your OS met an unhandleable exception.
The material linkages between works also suggest that they were conceived as a group, as in the many pieces that allegedly partook of the same "worktables turned into paintings Wedged at the base or riding astride the tops of wooden posts, these gestural paintings play two dimensions against three, particularizing their respective internal logics and engaging the spaces around them.