Gettysburg National Military Park

(redirected from Gettysburg Battlefield)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Gettysburg National Military Park

Address:97 Taneytown Rd
Gettysburg, PA 17325

Phone:717-334-1124
Fax:717-334-1891
Web: www.nps.gov/gett/
Size: 5,990 acres.
Established: Park established on February 11, 1895; transferred from War Department, along with cemetery, on August 10, 1933.
Location:In Adams County, Pennsylvania, 50 miles northwest of Baltimore. From north and south, follow US 15 to Gettysburg; from east and west, follow US 30.
Facilities:Youth group campsites, picnic area, rest rooms (é), bicycle trail, visitor center and cycloroma center (é), museum, self-guided tour/trail.
Activities:Camping, bicycling, auto tour, guided tours, interpretive programs.
Special Features:The great Civil War battle fought here July 1-3, 1863, repulsed the second Confederate invasion of the North and resulted in more than 51,000 soldiers being killed, wounded or captured, making it the bloodiest battle of the Civil War. Gettysburg National Cemetery (more than 7,000 interments; 1,668 unidentified) adjoins the park. President Lincoln delivered his Gettysburg Address here in dedicating the cemetery on November 19, 1863.

See other parks in Pennsylvania.
Parks Directory of the United States, 5th Edition. © 2007 by Omnigraphics, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Gettysburg Battlefield Book Series: Each Saturday from January 5 to March 2, Gettysburg park rangers lead informal, one-hour discussions of notable history books.
Some 9,000 of these guns were purchased by the Confederacy during the Civil War, so the fact your specimen was found on the Gettysburg battlefield means there is an almost 100 percent chance it was carried by a Rebel soldier.
(Curiously, Harry never wrote to me--it was always the phone--but I do have one letter from his wife, sent to me soon after we moved to Gettysburg, explaining that she was a descendent of one of the Gettysburg Culps who had given their name to a chief landmark of the Gettysburg battlefield, Culp's Hill.) Always, his concern was whether I had made enough of the Declaration of Independence, and Lincoln's love for it.
WithoutLWCF, some of America's most significant historic battlefields and monuments will lose critical funding that preserves them for future generations, including the iconic Gettysburg battlefield and the 9/11 Memorial.
Finally, our group visited the Gettysburg Battlefield National Military Park.
Matt Spruill, a retired US Army colonel, Civil War historian and lecturer, former Gettysburg battlefield guide, and author, and Lee Spruill, a retired US Army lieutenant colonel and author, delineate 16 key decisions made before and during the Battle of Stones River in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, during the Civil War, when the Army of the Cumberland and Army of Tennessee fought from December 1862 to January 1863 and the Union forces eventually won.
From July 1 to July 3, 1863 over 1,000 horses and mules were killed in the fighting that raged across the Gettysburg battlefield. These animals, fighting in an army they did not join, and in a conflict they did not begin, represent but a fraction of the over 1 million whose lives were claimed by the American Civil War.
soldiers killed in the line of duty on the Gettysburg battlefield. But even as a pall, following in the wake of the deaths, descended upon the encampment established on the Codori Farm, the marine mission had to proceed as planned.
ABRAHAM LINCOLN November 19, 1863, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania "Government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth." During America's civil war President Abraham Lincoln travelled to Gettysburg battlefield for the dedication of a soldier's cemetery.
In 2011, developers petitioned to build a casino a half mile from the Gettysburg battlefield. Preservationists successfully fought to prevent the project.
Both were sworn to an oath that did not know nationalities, uniforms or sides; dedicated to the preservation of life and alleviation of suffering in what has been aptly referred to by the late Gettysburg battlefield historian, Gregory Coco, as "a vast sea of misery."