Ghassulian Culture

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Ghassulian Culture

 

an archaeological culture of the Aeneolithic period (end of the fifth millennium B.C. to the fourth millennium B.C.). It is named after the village Teleilat el-Ghassul, which is situated 5.5 km east of the Jordan River. The Ghassulian culture was widespread over the territory of modern Jordan and Israel. It is characterized by flint tools and adobe buildings constructed on stone foundations, sometimes with interior wall paintings. The stone pottery and earthenware were made on a primitive wheel in the shape of goblets and amphorae. The dead were usually buried individually in stone cists.

REFERENCES

Childe. V. G. Drevneishii Vostok v svete novykh raskopok. Moscow. 1956. (Translated from English.)
Mallon. A. Teleilat Ghassul, vols. 1–2. Rome. 1934–40.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.