Thalassinidea

(redirected from Ghost shrimp)

Thalassinidea

[thə‚las·ə′nid·ē·ə]
(invertebrate zoology)
The mud shrimps, a group of thin-shelled, burrowing decapod crustaceans belonging to the Macrura; individuals have large chelate or subchelate first pereiopods, and no chelae on the third pereiopods.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Callianassid shrimp or ghost shrimp (Decapoda: Axiidea) dwell in generally deep burrows in estuarine or marine sediments and are known for their roles as community organizers and ecosystem engineers there (Atkinson & Taylor 2005, Pillay & Branch 2011).
Whale eats small fish apart from squid, krill, crab larvae, ghost shrimp and small bait fish such as capelin.
2 In 2015, he narrated a video for Adele's single Hello as if it were a nature documentary, saying: 'It's important for such a delicate and finely tuned animal that the lighting and the setting is just right - and now it is.' 3 He has many creatures named after him, including a wingless beetle, dinosaurs, a ghost shrimp, a pygmy locust and flowering plants called Sirdavidia.
Pay close attention when doing this-- there's a reason why they're also called "ghost shrimp."
To find out, we used pumps to suction the ghost shrimp out of their burrows.
Most jetty anglers bait their hook with sand shrimp, ghost shrimp, pile worms, herring or a plastic imitation of one of those.
The ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis) and the mud shrimp (Upogebiapugettensis) inhabit the tideflats in estuaries where the oysters are grown.
Sakai (biology, Shikoku U., Tokushima, Japan) is a leading expert on the taxonomy of the Thalassinidea, in particular the Callianassoidea (crustaceans commonly known as ghost shrimp or mud lobster.) In this monograph, he provides a comprehensive reassessment of the classification of the superfamily's included taxa--three families, 12 subfamilies, 20 genera, and 218 species (some new)--based on examination of material from major collections of the Zoological Museum of the University of Copenhagen.
The whales are attracted by an abundance of ghost shrimp buried in the sand along Puget Sound, about 30 miles north of Seattle.
Then came the ghost shrimp, which burrow into the sand, making the bottom so soft that oysters sink and suffocate.
Mitochondria from other crustaceans including the ghost shrimp Lepidophthalmus louisianensis (Holman & Hand 2009) and the northern shrimp Crangon crangon and Palaemon serratus (Konrad et al.
They also eat blue crabs, mud crabs, shrimps and "ghost shrimp" (burrowing crab that resembles shrimp).