Ghorids

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Ghorids

 

a dynasty of sultans from Ghor, from the house of Suri. They founded an independent state (1148–1206) in the upper reaches of the Hari Rud and Helmand rivers, the center of which was the mountainous Ghor region (in what is present-day Afghanistan) and the capitals, the cities of Firoz Koh and Ghazni. The Ghorid state achieved its greatest power under the sultans Ghiyas-ud-Din Muhammad (1163–1203) and Shihab-ud-din (Muizz-ud-Din or Muhammad Ghori; 1203–06). who seized almost the entire territory of present-day Afghanistan and also Sind, Punjab. Benares, and other regions and cities in India. Having joined battle with the Khwarezm-Shahs, the Ghorid troops were defeated, and their state disintegrated in 1206.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast to the Ghurid heartland, several sites here clearly evidenced ancient constructions and their later repurposing in the 12th century, probably by the Ghurids.
Though she acknowledges the impossibility of a comprehensive list of Persian-Language literature in India, Adamjee provides a succinct overview of many significant writers and texts associated with the Ghaznavids, Ghurids, Delhi Sultans, and Mughals.
Punjab and NWFP also remained under the influence of Ghaznavides, Ghurids, Ilkhans, Ismailies and Khwarzan Shah.
He lived when the Ghaznavid and Ghurids ruled the Indus region.
'A hundred years later another Islamic dynasty came, the Ghurids and one of their commanders, Qutb al-Din Aibak, established the Delhi Sultanate.
During the ruling of Ghaznavids and Ghurids, Persian language first spread in the north of India and since the early 8th century, the Persian gathered in that part of India.
Then the Ghurids from Afghanistan ruled India extending their eastern territories to the northern Ganges-Jamuna Doab, with Delhi as the capital.
As a renowned scholar he found generous patronage under the Ghurids and later on under the Khwarizm Shahs who inherited the Seljuq realms.
(49.) Most notably the Khwarazmshahs and Ghurids; see, e.g., J.
(15.) David Thomas, The Minaret of Jam and the Ghurids: an Introduction, Kabul: MJAP, c.
She focuses instead on customs among Massagetae, Ichthyophagi, Hephtalites, Bactrians, and Ghurids of Central Asia and easternmost Iran, plus a range of practices from Anatolia and Babylonia to India and Tibet, to explain the stereotypical allegations of women-sharing leveled by Muslim heresiographers and geographers.
With the southward expansion of the Khwarazmshahs and Mongols, the Iranian and Indian territories of the Ghurids were split, bringing to an end their "idiosyncratic transregional experiment" (p.