Gia Long


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Gia Long

 

(born Nguyen Phuc Anh). Born 1762; died 1820. Became emperor of Vietnam in 1802; founder of the Nguyen dynasty.

Gia Long belonged to the Nguyen feudal house, which ruled in southern Vietnam from the 16th through the 18th centuries. He led the feudal lords of southern Vietnam in the war against the rebelling Tay Son peasants in the 18th century. He concluded the first unequal treaty with France in 1787, striving to obtain its military assistance in the struggle against the popular uprising. After the Tay Son Uprising was suppressed throughout the entire territory of Vietnam (by 1802), Gia Long united the country under the authority of the Nguyen house. He carried out a series of progressive reforms.

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After ten additional years of fighting, Tay Sob forces succumbed to the southern armies of Nguyen Phuc Anh who in 1802 was proclaimed Emperor Gia Long (r.
There, these people watched as the southern prince Nguyen Phuc Anh (1762-1820) gradually overcame the rebels and in 1802 brought peace to the Vietnamese after thirty years of war, founding the Nguyen dynasty and taking the throne name of Gia Long.
Within the Imperial City lies the Purple Forbidden City (Imperial Enclosure), built and occupied by the Emperor Gia Long in 1804.
Michele Thompson attempts to provide the closer context for Jean Marie Despieu, a French physician associated with the rulers Gia Long and Ming Mang in the early nineteenth century.
Construction of the Long Wall started in 1819 under the direction of Le Van Duyet, a high-ranking mandarin serving Emperor Gia Long, and it served to demarcate territory and regulate trade and travel between the Viet in the plains and the Hre tribes in the mountain valleys.
Chapter 1 provides the background on the relationship between the Nguyen rulers and the MEP, in particular Emperors Gia Long and Minh Mang.
In 1802, an emperor named Gia Long united and named the country Vietnam.
Emperor Gia Long founded the Nguyen dynasty, which ruled in Hue between 1802 and 1945.
Hue was the capital of Vietnam's last dynasty: Emperor Gia Long modeled the palace and its huge walled compound after the Chinese imperial complex in Beijing.
After a key Tay Scan victory in 1773, and the subsequent death of almost all princes of the Nguyen family, the last one to resist-Nguyen Anh, the future Emperor Gia Long (r.
In 1787, with assistance from French mercenaries and supporters in Vietnam, the Nguyen forces returned by way of Phu Quoc and the Quadrangle and fought their way north over the next fifteen years, finally recapturing the Nguyen palace in Hue and defeating the Tay Son in Ha Noi After unifying the nation in 1802, Nguyen Anh took the imperial title Gia Long and founded the Nguyen Dynasty.
Volume One covers four volumes of the Gia Long archives - virtually all the documents of the reign - and Volume Two covers the first five years of the reign of Minh Mang (1820-25), an extremely important transitional period in pre-modern Vietnamese history.