Giacobinids


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Giacobinids

(ja-koh -bă-nidz) (Draconids) A meteor shower, radiant RA 262°, dec 54° (in Draco), that maximizes on 8 Oct. The parent of the shower is comet Giacobini–Zinner (period 6.6 years). The shower has been seen five times, in 1926, 1933, 1946, 1952, and 1985. In 1933 the Earth crossed the orbit about 80 days after the parent comet and the resulting meteor storm was the most spectacular this century. In 1946 the Earth crossed the orbit 15 days behind the comet, and the 4.2-meter radar at Jodrell Bank recorded a maximum of 10 000 meteors per hour; this observation was one of the first major successes of meteor radar astronomy.

Giacobinids

[jə′kä·bə‚nidz]
(astronomy)
A meteor shower that reaches maximum about October 10, associated with Comet P/Giacobini-Zinner.
References in periodicals archive ?
OCTOBER 8 - DRACONID METEOR SHOWER Another one which has the advantage of new moon, the Draconid meteor shower is also called the Giacobinids.
The Draconid meteor shower, also known as the Giacobinids, takes place every year and is one of the two meteor showers to light up the skies in October.
amp;nbsp;Sometimes referred to as the Giacobinids, the meteor shower's peak will occur Friday night, but it's best observed during the early evening hours, (http://earthsky.
Looking further ahead, the best prospect for a truly spectacular meteor storm in the next 50 years would perhaps be the Giacobinids of 2011 October 9, expected to reach maximum at sometime between 19h10 UT and 20h40 UT on that evening.
Tonight's meteors are called the Giacobinids - after the comet from which they were spawned - or Draconids, because they appear to come from the direction of the constellation Draco.
The Giacobinids are, however, feeble in comparison with what is expected from another meteor family, the Leonids, next month.
Nevertheless the 1999 Leonids produced a spectacular display, certainly comparable to the 20th century's two other epic meteor outbursts: by the Giacobinids (Draconids) in 1933 and 1946.
Japanese meteor observer Daiy Ito reported seeing 40 Giacobinids in one 50-minute stretch when the radiant was still low and the limiting magnitude was 4.
between the comet's orbit and Earth's increased considerably - and the Giacobinids completely vanished from our skies.
And in subsequent years, the Giacobinids once again returned.
Expectations are mounting for a Perseid spectacle this year or next, and perhaps whoppers from the Giacobinids in 1998 or Leonids in 1998 or 1999.