Giacobinids


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Giacobinids

(ja-koh -bă-nidz) (Draconids) A meteor shower, radiant RA 262°, dec 54° (in Draco), that maximizes on 8 Oct. The parent of the shower is comet Giacobini–Zinner (period 6.6 years). The shower has been seen five times, in 1926, 1933, 1946, 1952, and 1985. In 1933 the Earth crossed the orbit about 80 days after the parent comet and the resulting meteor storm was the most spectacular this century. In 1946 the Earth crossed the orbit 15 days behind the comet, and the 4.2-meter radar at Jodrell Bank recorded a maximum of 10 000 meteors per hour; this observation was one of the first major successes of meteor radar astronomy.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

Giacobinids

[jə′kä·bə‚nidz]
(astronomy)
A meteor shower that reaches maximum about October 10, associated with Comet P/Giacobini-Zinner.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Draconid meteor shower is also known as the Giacobinids. It is one of two meteor showers to grace our skies in October.
Another one which has the advantage of new moon, the Draconid meteor shower is also called the Giacobinids. They are named after the constellation Draco the Dragon and are created when the earth passes through the dust debris left by comet 21 P/ Giacobini-Zinner.
OCTOBER 8 - DRACONID METEOR SHOWER Another one which has the advantage of new moon, the Draconid meteor shower is also called the Giacobinids. They are named after the constellation Draco the Dragon and are created when the earth passes through the dust debris left by comet 21 P/ Giacobini-Zinner.
The Draconid meteor shower, also known as the Giacobinids, takes place every year and is one of the two meteor showers to light up the skies in October.
If you're looking to start your weekend off on an astronomical note, the Draconid meteor shower should offer some decent entertainment. Sometimes referred to as the Giacobinids, the meteor shower's peak will occur Friday night, but it's best observed during the early evening hours, (http://earthsky.org/astronomy-essentials/everything-you-need-to-know-draconid-meteor-shower) according to EarthSky.
Usually the Draconid shower (formerly called the Giacobinids) puts on only a weak show of about 10 or 20 meteors visible per hour at most, even as seen by an observer under a black sky with the shower's radiant point in Draco directly overhead (the shower's zenithal hourly rate, or ZHR).
Looking further ahead, the best prospect for a truly spectacular meteor storm in the next 50 years would perhaps be the Giacobinids of 2011 October 9, expected to reach maximum at sometime between 19h10 UT and 20h40 UT on that evening.
Tonight's meteors are called the Giacobinids - after the comet from which they were spawned - or Draconids, because they appear to come from the direction of the constellation Draco.
The Draconid meteor shower, also known as the Giacobinids, takes place every year and is one of two meteor showers to light up the skies in October.
Nevertheless the 1999 Leonids produced a spectacular display, certainly comparable to the 20th century's two other epic meteor outbursts: by the Giacobinids (Draconids) in 1933 and 1946.
As a consequence, the distance .between the comet's orbit and Earth's increased considerably - and the Giacobinids completely vanished from our skies.