Giambologna


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Giambologna:

see Bologna, GiovanniBologna, Giovanni,
or Giambologna
, 1524–1608, Flemish sculptor, whose real name was Jean Bologne or Boulogne. Though born in Douai, France, he trained in Flanders. He is identified chiefly with the Italian Renaissance as one of its greatest sculptors.
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Giambologna

original name Giovanni da Bologna or Jean de Boulogne. 1529--1608, Italian mannerist sculptor, born in Flanders: noted for his fountains and such works as Samson Slaying a Philistine (1565)
References in periodicals archive ?
Giambologna: narrator of the Catholic reformation [cited 2016 May 9].
"Storia d'una Fontana: Il Bacco del Giambologna in Borgo San Jacopo." Mitteilungen des Kunshisorischen Institutes in Florenz XXXIII: 1,131-146.
The sculpture is almost an exact copy of one made for Cardinal Ferdinand de' Medici in 1580 by Giambologna (1529-1608).
This original was an etiolated and graceful figure carved in Italy by the famous Giambologna, whose work was known in England through miniature bronze versions.
The original now resides in the Galleria dell'Accademia, and although the museum contains countless other works of art of the highest calibre by Renaissance masters including Giambologna, still nothing quite prepares you for the magnificence and sheer scale of the undertaking, as the sculptor's hero stands tall and in victorious pose having defeated the mighty Goliath.
Mary Weitzel Gibbons argues that Giambologna's equestrian statue of Duke Cosimo, commissioned by Ferdinando I and placed in the Piazza della Signoria, breaks new ground in imperial imagery by "visually exemplif[ying] the concept of discipline and control through its connection to the art and culture of tiding" (p.
(39.) Outre la statue conservee a Vienne, on ne connait en effet que trois autres exemplaires executes par Jean de Bologne entre 1579 et 1589, conserves a Naples, Dresde et Florence, voir Giambologna (1529-1608).
For a Giambologna, the production of derived works was a tool for promotion and European celebrity, while for the Northern ivory workers, who were forgotten by dominant historiography, intensive production could not prevent them from slipping into anonymity.
The Mauritshuis has acquired a flower cartouche by Daniel Seghers that was owned by its first director in the 19th century, while two days before it was due to be auctioned, the State Art Collections of Dresden were able to purchase a Giambologna bronze that the artist gave to Elector Christian I of Saxony in 1587.
Ambitious form; Giambologna, Ammanati, and Danti in Florence.