Gibeon

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Gibeon

(gĭb`ēən), ancient town, 5 mi (8 km) NNW of Jerusalem. The Book of Joshua relates that its inhabitants established a treaty with the invading Israelites, resulting in their servitude to Israel. According to legend, the sun stood still in Gibeon while Israel battled the AmoritesAmorites
, a people of Canaan. There is evidence of them in Babylonia, where in the 19th cent. B.C. they established under their patronage the first dynasty at Babylon. The most powerful king of this dynasty, Hammurabi, put an end (18th cent. B.C.
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. Modern excavations there have discovered a water system, perhaps referred to in Second Samuel and Jeremiah. See GibbarGibbar
, in the Book of Ezra, family that returned with Zerubbabel. In a similar list in the Book of Nehemiah, Gibeon appears instead; therefore, Gibbar may stand for Gibeon, and the children of Gibbar are then Gibeonites.
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.

Bibliography

See studies by J. B. Pritchard (1962, 1964) and J. Blenkinsopp (1972).

Gibeon

an ancient town of Palestine: the excavated site thought to be its remains lies about 9 kilometres (6 miles) northwest of Jerusalem
References in periodicals archive ?
What Hareven undoubtedly noticed about these transformations is that they seem to undermine or blur the boundaries articulated by the Deuteronomic code: the stories of Rahab and the Gibeonites argue for flexibility in the determination of Israel's internal boundaries.
The fictitious painting depicts David avenging the Gibeonites.
She was the concubine of Saul, and it is two of her sons who are killed by the Gibeonites.
To be "hewers of wood and drawers of water" was Joshua's curse on the Gibeonites (Joshua 9:23-27).
Later her sons were delivered by King David to the Gibeonites and were impaled by them "on the mountain before the Lord", without receiving a proper burial, so that their bodies were lying out in the field (2 Sam.
Another case of Gentiles joining the covenant community involves the Gibeonites, who succeeded in doing so only through trickery (Josh.
Another example of the number seven's association with rainfall in the Bible was the unforgivable sacrifice of the sons of King Saul, whom King David handed over to the Gibeonites.
According to Yahweh, Saul's people had done wrong by a massacre of the Gibeonites, whom Israel had sworn to spare.
When David killed seven of Saul's descendants to appease the Gibeonites, he spared Mephibosheth because of this oath: The king spared Mephibosheth son of Jonathan son of Saul, because of the oath before the Lord between the two, between David and Jonathan son of Saul (II Sam.
More impressively, a nation that persistently complained throughout Moses' 40 years of leadership grumbled only once in the Book of Joshua--to the elders (and not to Joshua) after they mistakenly struck a treaty with the Gibeonites (9:18).
He turned over two sons and five grandsons of King Saul to the Gibeonites, to hang then in vengeance for their grievances against Saul (II Samuel 21).