Gibson girl


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Related to Gibson girl: Charles Dana Gibson

Gibson girl

classic, comely woman of illustrations (1890s). [Am. Hist.: Flexner, 283]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Queer creators have superbly refocused the traditional calendar girl through an all-female lens, sending up classic pinups such as the Gibson girl, the Varga girl and the Tiger Beat toughie.
There are ten dolls in all, beginning (since they appeared out of chronological order) with Gibson Girl Barbie, proceeding to Flapper Barbie, Egyptian Queen Barbie, Southern Belle Barbie, Medieval Lady Barbie, Elizabethan Queen Barbie, Grecian Goddess Barbie, Victorian Lady Barbie, French Lady Barbie, and finally Chinese Empress Barbie.
My mother's mother wore hers in a soft Gibson girl pile.
If you've ever puzzled over the disappearance of fashionable silhouettes of previous decades--the bunker-chested Gibson Girl of the 1910s, the boyish flapper girl of the 1920s--remember those styles peaked before the invention of bra cups for suspending each breast individually made the idea of both a bosom (singular) and a flat chest obsolete.
people conveniently forgot to include it in their press release, Life started life as a humor magazine in 1883 and was relatively successful for its first 50 years (Charles Dana Gibson -- the illustrator of the "Gibson Girl" -- was discovered by Life).
And treat yourself from the soda fountain and ice cream favourites atThe Gibson Girl Ice Cream Parlour.
Whether the goody-goody Gibson girl or the dancing flapper, the single woman finally had purchasing power.
James anticipated by six years the illustrator Charles Dana Gibson's creation of the wildly popular "Gibson Girl"--the pert, athletic figure who romped across newspaper cartoons, posters, and items of memorabilia, besting her tongue-tied (but charmed) beau at sports.
Undine's character in fact reiterates the dominant narrative of the waning Gibson Girl she resembles.
However, the slimmer, more athletic-looking Gibson Girl, first created by artist Charles Dana Gibson, replaced it as the ideal in the 1890s, and thinness has remained an integral part of female attractiveness ever since.
Gibson's idealized depiction of the perfect American woman, who came to be known as the Gibson Girl, soon swept the country.
He illustrated many books and articles, notably the stories of <IR> RICHARD HARDING DAVIS </IR> , but his greatest triumph was the creation (1896) of the "Gibson Girl," who appeared in innumerable drawings.