Gide


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Gide

Andr? . 1869--1951, French novelist, dramatist, critic, diarist, and translator, noted particularly for his exploration of the conflict between self-fulfilment and conventional morality. His novels include L'Immoraliste (1902), La Porte ?troite (1909), and Les Faux-Monnayeurs (1926): Nobel prize for literature 1947

Gide

 

a river in Sweden. The Gide River flows into the Gulf ofBothnia in the Baltic Sea. Length, 204 km; basin area, approxi-mately 3, 500 sq km. There are ten waterfalls along its course (thelargest, 25 m high). The Gide is used for timber rafting. Thereis a hydroelectric power plant on the river.

References in periodicals archive ?
Emphasizing the historical and cultural context in which Gide and Barrault approach The Trial's parable of unjust persecution, this paper rather suggests that Le Proces marks a turn toward politically cognizant interpretations of Kafka in the postwar era.
The new landlord's planned renovations for the building also secured Gide's decision to renew because it assures the property will be well cared for and maintained at the highest level of quality."
Les annees ont passe, L'Immoraliste n'a pas empeche Andre Gide de continuer d'ecrire, de continuer de dire; il recoit meme en 1947 le prix Nobel de litterature.
The first, "Gide's Anxiousness," describes the poet's deep fascination and long-time engagement wit Ii the Persephone myth, as he struggled with Catholic faith and ethics in light of his engagement with pederasty.
The Complexities of the Structure of Gide's Discourse on Sexuality
Gonzalez-Crussi, the author of The Day of the Dead: And Other Mortal Reflections (1993), cites Andre Gide, the French novelist and memoirist.
Canovas also explores the connections between visual and literary arts in his study of painter Maurice Denis's illustrations for Verlaine's Sagesse and Gide's Le Voyage d'Urien.
Herve Jodoin, middle-aged misanthrope and serious drinker, grudgingly takes a job at the bookstore and is soon let in on its secret: it sells books that the Church has forbidden, books by "writers like Gide, Maeterlinck, Renan, Voltaire, Zola." Thus Herve, sort of a Quebecois proto-slacker, becomes embroiled in a scheme he couldn't care less about and ignites a controversy that at most he finds a little amusing.
He then turns to Western observers, with separate short chapters focusing in particular on the texts of Bertrand Russell, Arthur Koestler, Andre Gide, Lion Feuchtwanger, Bertolt Brecht, and, his longtime favorite and most extensively researched example, Walter Benjamin.