Gilbreths

Gilbreths

disciplined family brought up to abide by strict, punctual standards. [Am. Lit.: Cheaper by the Dozen]
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I remember that long ago in the '70s, when like the Gilbreths in Cheaper by the Dozen, we stopped at every promising clump of trees, when driving long distances such as from Lahore to Karachi, and back.
37) Indeed, it was the Gilbreths, a husband and wife duo of Taylorist disciples, who first translated worker knowledge and function into modern job descriptions in the form of work instruction cards.
There were people called the Gilbreths who did time and motion studies and wrote Cheaper By the Dozen (Frank B.
The Gilbreths, who were industrial engineers, were employed as "efficiency experts" by major industrial plants in the early 1900s.
He perceives the Gilbreths and Gantt as trying to soften the force of their mentor Taylor and hence began to conceive of and leverage power as being properly flowing from the bottom up in the organization.
The Gilbreths were the founders of modern motion technique, the study of the body motions used in performing an operation in order to improve the operation by eliminating unnecessary motions, simplifying necessary motions, and establishing the most favorable motion sequence for maximum efficiency.
Like Taylor, the Gilbreths deplored inefficiency: "The greatest waste in the world comes from needless, ill-directed, and ineffective motions" (Gilbreth & Gilbreth, 1917/1953, p.
It was, however, just one of the concepts the Gilbreths developed.
42) Frederick had the opportunity to associate with the Gilbreths after they moved to New Jersey at war's end in 1918, but it was Frank, not Lillian, to whom she looked for professional camaraderie.
Yet it was in the reform of office work, and particularly through the efforts of Frank and Lilian Gilbreth (1914) that the labour process became most obviously gendered, where men managed women -- in fact, as immortalized in the film Cheaper by the Dozen the routinization of the workplace is extended into the home, and even the womb (the Gilbreths had 12 children) and t urned into an ironic romp about the way that they reputedly lived their lives together according to work-study principles.
In reviewing the works of such pioneers as Owen (1857), Babbage (1832), Taylor (1903 & 1911), Gantt (1910, 1916, & 1919), the Gilbreths (1917), Fayol (1930), Weber (1947), Follett (1918), Barnard (1938), and others, Wren provides compelling insight on how modern management is, in large part, simply applied science that appears to implicitly assume that "when family and business are interrelated, a less effective business enterprise generally results" (Donnelly, 1964, p.
But it was in the decade before World War I that work by Frederick Taylor, Henry Gantt, Harrington Emerson, the Gilbreths and others produced a body of knowledge and principles that could be dignified by the term "science.