gill raker

gill raker

[′gil ‚rāk·ər]
(vertebrate zoology)
One of the bony processes on the inside of the branchial arches of fishes which prevents the passage of solid substances through the branchial clefts.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dorsal- and anal-fin ray counts include both rays on last pterygiophore; gill raker counts are presented as a total count followed by upper + angle + lower rakers in parentheses.
(2004) studied the gill raker morphology and feeding ecology of two morphs of the European whitefish Coregonus lavaretus (Salmoniformes: Salmonidae: Coregoninae).
Gill raker counts include rudiments and only a total count is given as it is difficult to determine which gill raker is at the angle.
Wankowski (1979) and Qin and Fast (1998) also reported that feeding limitations occur in many fish larvae related to mouth gape width and gill raker spacing.
The distance between the gill rakers of the first gill arch, the distance between the spines of the fourth gill arch, the number of gill rakers per gill arch and the number of spines per gill raker did not show homogeneous variances and were analyzed with a Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA followed by a multiple comparisons test of means by ranks.
Five morphological traits were measured as described in Schluter and McPhail (1992): body length, body depth, gape width, gill raker number, and gill raker length.
Other characters were tested with the Kruskal-Wallis test and, with the exception of gill raker length, all differed significantly between 2 or more species (Table 5).
This paper deals with the small ossicles such as bony platelets, scutes, tubercles, prickles, ossified sensory line segments, oral and branchial denticles and ossified gill raker tubercles of the cottoid families Cyclopteridae and Liparidae of the Baltic Sea.
As viewed using scanning electron microscopy, the sites of gill raker removal had healed completely and the arches were smooth but undamaged.
Gill raker and pyloric caecae counts for these two fish were within the ranges for sockeye salmon described by Scott and Crossman (1973).