Giorgio de Chirico


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Chirico, Giorgio de

(jōr`jō dā kē`rēkō), 1888–1978, Italian painter, b. Vólos, Greece. Chirico developed his enigmatic vision in Munich and Italy and from 1911 to 1915 he worked and exhibited in Paris. His powerful, disturbing paintings employ steep perspective, mannequin figures, empty space, and forms used out of context to create an atmosphere of mystery and loneliness. His work exercised a considerable influence on early surrealist painters but was never successfully imitated. In Ferrara, Chirico developed what he termed metaphysical painting, in which he consciously exploited the symbolism of his art. Chirico is represented in leading galleries throughout the world.

Bibliography

See his memoirs (tr. 1972); studies by J. T. Soby (1955, repr. 1967) and I. Far (tr. 1971).


De Chirico, Giorgio:

see Chirico, Giorgio deChirico, Giorgio de
, 1888–1978, Italian painter, b. Vólos, Greece. Chirico developed his enigmatic vision in Munich and Italy and from 1911 to 1915 he worked and exhibited in Paris.
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Two elements predominate in Giorgio De Chirico's paintings.
As a student in Madrid, Dall got to know the Prado Museum and the cubist works of Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, and the metaphysical paintings of Giorgio de Chirico. Encouraged by the attention of his peers and association with Lorca, he ventured outside the restrictions and requirements of the school.
Classical images stand juxtaposed with modern icons of famous and familiar faces such as such as Leonardo Da Vinci, Giorgio de Chirico, Freud, Parajanov, and Brecht.
The interior is a dramatic carving-out of space around an external courtyard, with shades of Giorgio de Chirico in its geometric regiment of dark shutters on plain white walls, and a soaring lobby.
I've always been fascinated by Giorgio de Chirico's early paintings - those haunting, long-shadowed Italian piazzas with arcades and towers, or perhaps a viaduct, complete with stream-train.
Including such diverse artists as Tony Oursler (whose video and sound installation of a woman apparently trapped under a settee is one of the creepiest things you will ever see), Giorgio de Chirico, Sarah Lucas and the Paris photographers Brassei and Eugene Atget, it's a mixed bag to say the least, and a bit hit-and-miss in effect.