Giovanni Gabrieli

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Gabrieli, Giovanni

 

Born 1557 (?), in Venice; died Aug. 12, 1612 or 1613, in Venice. Italian composer. Nephew and pupil of A. Gabrieli.

From 1575 to 1579, Gabrieli was a member of the court choir conducted by O. Lasso (Munich). From 1584 he was an organist at St. Mark’s Cathedral (Venice). Gabrieli was a great master of the Venetian school and the author of ecclesiastical polyphonic compositions for several choruses, orchestras, and two organs. His “Sacred Symphonies” laid the foundation for orchestral music, and his organ works were the first examples of solo organ music. The German composer H. Schütz studied with Gabrieli.

REFERENCES

Winterfeld, C. Johannes Gabrieli und sein Zeitalter, vols. 1-2. Berlin, 1834.
Benvenuti, G. Andrea e Giovanni Gabrieli e la musica strumentale in San Marco, vols. 1-2. Milan, 1931-32.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Renaissance music lovers will enjoy four polyphonic works and a dance: two Canzone in majestic Venetian polychoral style by the Italian composer Giovanni Gabrielli, a Ricercare by Andrea Gabrielli, an arrangement by Alkis Baltas of the highly expressive French chanson Mille Regretz by the Franco-flemish composer Josquin des Prez, as well as the jubilant dance La Mourisque by the Flemish composer Tielman Susato.
Thus, your reviewer found himself pressed into service, holding up trumpeter Hudson's part (on an iPad) when the ensemble fanned out across the main floor to perform Giovanni Gabrielli's "Canzona No.
Haugen's score turned out to be a pastiche, mixing original music with quotations from the 16th- and 17th-century music of Orlando di Lasso, William Byrd, Giovanni Gabrielli and Nicolas Lanier.