Giunta

Giunta

 

in Italy, the executive branch of the government of a commune, province, or region. The giunta is elected for a four-year term by the corresponding municipal councils from among their own members. In communes the giunta is headed by the sindico (mayor) and in provinces and regions, by the president of the municipal council. The decisions of the giunta are controlled by representatives of the central government—by the prefects of provinces and by regional commissioners. The higher giuntas approve the most important decisions of lower municipal agencies.

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Because, as Giunta sees it, he was just doing his job.
Ottawa Choral Society's New Discoveries Auditions found four grand prizewinners in soprano Betty Allison, mezzo Wallis Giunta, baritone Alexander Hajek and bass-baritone Phillipe Sly.
The writings of Italian American women have been left in the shadows for too long, and Giunta seriously tries to remedy this situation with a sense of life or death importance.
The Army already has a significant WMD defense capability, but many homeland defense agencies are not aware of what the Army has to offer, Giunta said.
Since Aldus sued the Giunta press in 1507 and 1514 for their pirating of his titles, it would have made little sense for the Giunti to antagonize Aldus further by printing another of his titles.
Addison-Wesley was represented by Phil Giunta of Leggat McCall/Grubb & Ellis of Waltham, Mass.
Giunta handled transactions for The Greenbrier Companies, Oaktree Capital Management LLC, the Special Committee of Times Mirror, the Special Committee of Spiros Development Corporation, Del Webb Corporation, Plum Creek Timber Co.
Giunta is AMHCA President-Elect, 2013-2014, and Chair, Conference Planning Committee
The $3,000 second prize went to mezzo Wallis Giunta, currently a member of the Canadian Opera Company Ensemble Studio.
What we really need to do is just take slides and present them at each town meeting," Chairman Cathy Giunta said.
Giunta estimated that a common trainer would save the Army $22 million over 10 years.