Givatayim


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Givatayim

(gĭvätä`yĭm), town (1994 pop. 46,500), W central Israel, a residential suburb of Tel Aviv. It was the first Jewish workers' development in Palestine in the 1920s. Industries include printing and food processing.
References in periodicals archive ?
The District Planning and Building Commission has passed for validation an urban renewal facility in Givatayim.
It is exactly like McDonald's: what is the connection between a child from Givatayim (a Jewish town) eating McDonald's and a child from Barta'a (a Palestinian village) eating McDonald's?
Lazar facilitated the arrangements for site visits and helped secure additional discussions with Doron Polak, the curator of the Joseph Wiessman Givatayim Municipal Gallery; Dr.
Oganesian opened Deda, his first Georgian restaurant, about five years ago in Givatayim, outside Tel Aviv.
It was in the Tel Aviv suburbs of Ramat Gan and Givatayim, where Iraqi immigrants settled, that sabich, now wrapped in the ubiquitous Middle Eastern pita, found a home.
158) Itzhak Yaron, the former mayor of Givatayim, explained
43) There are also memorials to Babi Yar in Denver, CO; New York City; and Givatayim, Israel.
After finishing their undergraduate studies, all of them, without exception, left their initial place of residence in Israel, and most migrated to Tel Aviv and its suburbs--Ramat Gan, Givatayim, Kiryat Ono, Holon, Bat-Yam, etc.
GIVATAYIM, Israel: Recently I took part as a moderator in an international conference that examined dialogue between people from different backgrounds in a multicultural society.
A 62-year-old retired textile businessman from Givatayim outside Tel Aviv, Chaim Markuza said: "If we give up the Gaza Strip, by the same token we can give up Israel.
He often helps with the Israeli Astronomical Association's public outreach programs at Givatayim Municipality Observatory near Tel Aviv.
Another study of the Standard Mortality Ratios of eight municipalities in the central coastal area of Israel over the same time period found the highest rates (for all causes of death combined) in the development town of Or Yehudah and the lowest in Givatayim (an affluent Jewish locality) and B'nai Brak (a poor city with a large concentration of ultra-Orthodox Jews).