Glåma


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Glåma

or

Glomma

(both: glô`mä), longest river of Norway, c.365 mi (590 km) long, rising in the highlands of Sør-Trøndelag co., SE Norway. It flows generally S past Sarpsborg (the head of navigation), into the Skagerrak at Fredrikstad. The Vorma River, which drains Mjøsa Lake, is its chief tributary. The Glåma's numerous waterfalls are the sites of hydroelectric stations; the lower river furnishes power to the urban industrial complex between Sarpsborg and Fredrikstad. The Glåma, passing through a heavily forested region, is Norway's chief timber-floating river.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Glåma

 

or Glomma, a river in southern Norway, one of the longest on the Scandinavian peninsula. Length, 611 km; basin area, 40,500 sq km. It originates in the lakes of the Sør-Trøndelag highlands, flows through the Østerdalen valley, and empties into the Skagerrak. Below Lake Øyeren are several waterfalls, including the Vammafoss (31 m high) and Sarpsfoss (21 m), which feed five hydroelectric power plants with capacities ranging from 27 to 104 megawatts. In the spring and early summer the water rises considerably (up to 8.3 m). The average flow is 400-440 cu m per sec in the lower reaches. The Glåma is the chief lumber-floating artery for Norway, and there are bypass canals at the waterfalls. The river is navigable to the Sarpsfoss falls and in places above that.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.