Glacier Wind

glacier wind

[′glā·shər ‚wind]
(meteorology)
A shallow gravity wind along the icy surface of a glacier, caused by the temperature difference between the air in contact with the glacier and free air at the same altitude.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Glacier Wind

 

a wind blowing over a glacier and moving in the direction of the glacier’s flow. The wind is caused by the cooling of air by the ice surface and is observed over many large glaciers. It assumes the character of run-off winds over the glacier plateaus of Antarctica and Greenland.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
NaturEner currently owns and operates the 210MW Glacier wind project in Montana and expects to begin construction of the new Rim Rock wind project, an up to 300MW facility also located in Montana, in 2011.