Glarean

Glarean

 

(Glareanus; pseudonym of Heinrich Loris; also Loritus, Loriti). Born June 1488, in Mollis, canton of Glarus; died Mar. 28, 1563, in Freiburg. Swiss humanist scholar, music theoretician, and educator.

Glarean began to study at the University of Cologne in 1506, and in 1510 he became a master of arts. He taught at the universities of Basel (in 1514 and from 1522) and Paris (1517-22). In 1529 he became a professor of poetics at Freiburg. Glarean was an erudite scholar. His articles on music exercised considerable influence on the development of music theory and are an important source for modern music scholars. Glarean’s main musical treatise is the Dodecachordon (1547). He broadened the system of modes, adding four new modes to the medieval eight. In his modal system he distinguished two main modes—the Ionian (major) and the Aeolian (minor)—which were widespread in musical practice (especially popular) but not admitted by conservative musicians. The Italian Renaissance composer and musical scholar G. Zarlino developed Glarean’s system.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Es en su honor que el premio de la Sociedad suiza de investigacion musical lleva el nombre de prix Glarean.
As a further example, Iain Fenlon tells, in his essay "Hernando Colon, Heinrich Glarean and others" (p.
186) A letter by Heinrich Glarean confirms that Zwingli purchased the 1515 Aldine edition of Tertuallian's Apologeticum; yet Zwingli references Tertullian explicitly some fifty times, frequently from works other than the Apologeticum.
Her painstaking reconstruction of this process of selection and of the sources used is presented in the second of the two chapters on Glarean.
In reconstructing the process by which Glarean accumulated his examples, by revealing its humanist roots, Judd posed a tantalizing question: how did Glarean intend his numerous examples of polyphonic music, notated in choirbook format, to function in his treatise?
The passage certainly does contain an element of suspense, but rather than interpret it as an example of Obrechtian wit, why not take it seriously as an instance of what Glarean called the `maiestas' of Obrecht's music?
This is a misunderstanding of Zarlino and Glarean, and it serves to obscure just.
Iain Fenlon reconstructs, in turn, the library of the music theorist and humanist Heinrich Glarean, in which classical texts are paramount.
Indeed, the writings of Pietro Pontio, a contemporary theorist whose career and dates bring him closer to Ingegneri than any other, could well elucidate the modality/tonality of these works better than those cited, by Glarean, Bona and Banchieri.
It is now certain that Josquin worked for Louis XII (this is separate from Fallows's determination that Glarean confused Louis XI and Louis XII), who provided him with the benefice as a canon at St.
69) The de Silva Mass is lost; it is mentioned by Heinrich Glarean (see Dodecachordon, trans.
But Zarlino's book includes a curious twist: in the tenor partbook each piece gets a modal label, in this case using the pseudo-Greek terminology pioneered just two years earlier by Heinrich Glarean (1488-1563) in his great codification of the twelve modes, the Dodecachordon (Basel: Henricus Petri, 1547; reprint, New York: Broude Bros.