Glasgow Media Group

Glasgow Media Group

a group of Glasgow University-based researchers, formed in 1974, whose critical studies of television news broadcasting have attracted much attention. The main publications of the group are: Bad News (1976), More Bad News (1980), Really Bad News (1982) and War and Peace News (1985). Concerned about the ‘agenda-setting role of media’, the main focus of the work of the group has been on the way in which news is constructed, especially its alleged use of slanted STEREOTYPES and its tendency to ‘affirmation of the status quo’. Analysing news reports by utilizing CONTENT ANALYSIS along with modes of analysis drawn from the work of the ethnomethodologist Harvey Sacks, the Glasgow Group suggest that there exists an implicit ‘ideology’ within news broadcasting. They also quote the semiologist Roland BARTHES, that ‘reluctance to display its codes is a mark of a bourgeois society and the mass culture which has developed from it’. See also MASS MEDIA OF COMMUNICATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
The study, by the Glasgow Media Group, examined three months of drama programmes on British terrestrial channels between 4pm and 11pm from 1 January this year.
And the Glasgow Media Group exposed how trade unionists were victims of BBC prejudice in the 1970s and 1980s.
Work done by the Glasgow Media Group on the miners' strike showed how broadcast news in Britain gave a very one-sided account of the dispute, invariably showing incidents where miners were charging the police rather than vice-versa.
Deconstructing the news was an important part of the work: the Glasgow Media Group had looked at television in the 70s.

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