glasshouse

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glasshouse

Brit a glass building, esp a greenhouse, used for growing plants in protected or controlled conditions

greenhouse, glasshouse

A glass-enclosed, heated structure for growing plants and out-of-season fruits and vegetables under regulated, protected conditions. Also see conservatory, hothouse, orangery.
References in periodicals archive ?
The mill pond near Glasshouses Below - an iron lattice bridge across the River Nidd leading to Castlestead
POISED on the Welsh landscape 'like a giant raindrop', the spectacular dome at the National Botanic Garden is the largest single-span glasshouse in the world.
Before joining GlassHouse, Sharp has served as CEO at PowerSteering Software, Frictionless Commerce, and Context Integration.
It appears unlikely that the tropical glasshouse will be retained, although Moorbank's outdoor grounds are set to stay, with volunteers continuing to be involved in their maintenance, and with some public access.
When I ask people whether they have a glasshouse to grow crops in, they often say no but then on further enquiry, may admit that they have a conservatory or orangery.
The restoration plan for this area is to bring it back into cultivation as an Edwardian period kitchen garden including areas for trials and botanical collections such as dahlias as well as the glasshouse display collection of orchids and cacti.
Subtropical House: This is the largest of the glasshouses, rising to eight metres at the peak - a height sufficient to accommodate sizeable trees, including palms, tree ferns, a Norfolk Island pine and a giant bird-of-paradise plant.
Garden writer and author Rae Spencer-Jones said the Lord Foster-designed single-span glasshouse - which is the largest on the planet -was "a clear winner".
The exhibition in the Guildhall is on until the end of March after which Glasshouses continues its tour to other venues in and around the borough.
The heating system consists of a series of rusting iron pipes supplied by three unpredictable boilers while some of the glasshouses are desperately overcrowded.
In bringing together the practical and the public functions of glasshouse architecture, the Nolen Greenhouses seem still to pursue the observation of John Loudon in his 1822 Encyclopaedia of Gardening: that the 'great object' of glasshouse architecture is 'the admission of light and the power of applying heat with the least labour and expense'.