Glen Canyon Dam


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See also: National Parks and Monuments (table)National Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 49,075 (19,868) Mountain and coast scenery.
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Glen Canyon Dam,

710 ft (216 m) high, 1,560 ft (475 m) long, NE Ariz., on the Colorado River. The key unit of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation's Colorado River storage projectColorado River storage project,
a multipurpose plan, undertaken by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation in 1956, to control the flow of the upper Colorado and its tributaries and to aid in the development of the rugged, remote upper Colorado River basin; includes parts of Wyo.
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, it is one of the world's largest concrete dams (larger in bulk, though not in height, than Hoover DamHoover Dam,
726 ft (221 m) high and 1,244 ft (379 m) long, on the Colorado River between Nev. and Ariz.; one of the world's largest dams. Built between 1931 and 1936 by the U.S.
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). The dam, completed in 1963 and dedicated in 1966 after completion of its power-generation facilities, regulates the flow of the upper Colorado and its tributaries and produces hydroelectricity (since 1964). The dam sharply reduced the seasonal flow of the Colorado downstream, dramatically altering the ecology of the river in the Grand Canyon. Changes in water releases have been experimented with in an attempt to ameliorate the effects of the dam.

Lake Powell, formed by the dam, extends 186 mi (299 km) upstream into S Utah. The lake was named after the American explorer John W. PowellPowell, John Wesley,
1834–1902, American geologist and ethnologist, b. Mt. Morris (now part of New York City). The family moved to Illinois, where Powell joined the Natural History Society, making collections and serving as secretary of the society.
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, who mapped and named the canyon in 1870. This lake is the nucleus of the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (see National Parks and MonumentsNational Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 49,075 (19,868) Mountain and coast scenery.
..... Click the link for more information.
, table). Downstream is the Glen Canyon Bridge, 1,271 ft (387 m) long and 700 ft (213 m) high, one of the world's longest and highest steel-arch bridges.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Natural sediment supply limitation and the influence of the Glen Canyon Dam. Water Resour Res., 36(2) :515-542.
Nesting by mallards has become rather common in the low and variably turbid reach between Glen Canyon Dam and the Little Colorado River since 1980 (Stevens et al., 1997b).
Its natural history is one of constant change, but Glen Canyon Dam accelerated the pace of change beyond anything that nature could engineer.
Glen Canyon Dam has been among the most prominent of their targets.
The Glen Canyon Dam, on the Colorado River, is among man's most ambitious efforts to compensate for a lack of rainfall.
Today, environmentalists lobby to drain Lake Powell, which is an important source of electricity through Glen Canyon Dam.
He took a strong position in favor of a hydroelectric project above Lee's Ferry on the Colorado River, eventually leading to construction of Glen Canyon Dam, upstream from his namesake project.
In 1963 the Bureau of Reclamation completed the construction of Glen Canyon Dam, which created Lake Powell and provided the nation and the world with an aquatic recreational area in the arid desert of northern Arizona.
At 186 miles (300 kilometers) long, Lake Powell originated in 1963 when the Glen Canyon Dam began holding back the Colorado River.
A Story that Stands Like a Dam: Glen Canyon and the Struggle for the Soul of the West is a narrative history of the construction of the Glen Canyon Dam in the 1950s and 1960s.
Glen Canyon Dam, located on the Colorado River in Arizona, is used as a case study.
In a proposal that would have been unthinkable 10 years ago, a range of groups are calling for the dismantling of Arizona's Glen Canyon Dam, to restore the Colorado River's original flow.