Gliridae


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Related to Gliridae: Castoridae, Hazel Dormouse, Dormice, Myoxidae

Gliridae

[′glir·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The dormice, a family of mammals in the order Rodentia.

Gliridae

 

(dormice and hazel mice), a family of mammals of the order Rodentia. Some zoologists classify the mammals as a suborder. Fossil remains are known from the Oligocene. The body length ranges from 9 to 20 cm. The tail, which is usually slightly shorter than the body, is bushy in the majority of arboreal species and thinly haired in terrestrial species. The coloration of the upperparts is usually ochre-brown or gray.

There are six genera, distributed in the forests and forest steppes of Eurasia and in the forests and savannas of Africa and Japan. The USSR has five species, belonging to five genera: the common dormouse (Glis glis), the tree dormouse (Dryomys nitedula), the hazel mouse (Muscardinus avellanarius), the garden dormouse (Eliomys quercinus), and the mouselike dormouse (Myomimus personatus). In the USSR these five species are found as far east as the Urals and as far south as Southwest Asia, Middle Asia, and Western Altai. In the mountains the mammals are found at elevations to 3,500 m among rocks and sparse shrubbery.

Most dormice and hazel mice are crepuscular forest animals that live in tree hollows or in nests. The mammals feed on fruits and seeds. The winter is spent in dormancy. In some regions the mammals are destructive to orchards.

References in periodicals archive ?
(2008b): Cricetidae and Gliridae (Rodentia, Mammalia) from the Miocene and Pliocene of southern Spain.
2015: Dormouse (Gliridae) populations on the northern periphery of their distributional ranges: a review.
2017: A taxonomic review of hymenolepidids (Eucestoda, Hymenolepididae) from dormice (Rodentia, Gliridae), with descriptions of two new species.
2006: Interactions between dormice (Gliridae) and hole-nesting birds in nestboxes.
This is the case of the genus Armantomys De Bruijn 1966, a relatively large Gliridae endemic to the Iberian Peninsula ranging from the late Oligocene to the late middle Miocene.
1977: Ecology and reproduction of Gliridae (Mammalia) in northern Moravia.
2012a: Evidence of a complex phylogeographic structure in the common dormouse, Muscardinus avellanarius (Rodentia: Gliridae).
5/6), which is typical of the M2 of the majority of representatives of the family Gliridae. In the posterior part of this specimen a short postcentroloph seems to be present (Fig.
(1985): Glirinae (Gliridae, Rodentia) from the type area of the Aragonian and adjacent areas (provinces of Teruel and Zaragoza, Spain).
1983: Le poids du Muscardin (Muscardinus avellanarius Kaup., 1829) dans la nature (Gliridae, Rodentia).
2006: Factors determining the distribution of coexisting dormouse species (Gliridae, Rodentia).