Gliwice


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Gliwice

(glĭvē`tsĕ), Ger. Gleiwitz, city (1993 est. pop. 216,000), Śląskie prov., SW Poland. A coal-mining and steel-making center of the Katowice region, it also produces automobiles, machinery, and chemicals. Its busy port on the Gliwice Canal gives it access to the Baltic Sea via the Oder River. Chartered in 1276, Gliwice was ceded by Austria to Prussia in 1742 and returned to Poland after World War II.

Gliwice

 

a city in Poland, in Katowice Województwo. Population, 169,000 (1969). It is an important railroad junction and a river port on the Gliwice Canal. The city is the second most important manufacturing center of the Upper Silesian conurbation, with about 45,000 workers. Among the city’s industries are heavy machine-building, metallurgy, and chemicals. There is coal mining. The city has a polytechnical institute and metallurgical and other scientific research institutes. Gliwice has existed as a city since the end of the 13th century.

Gliwice

an industrial city in S Poland. Pop.: 212 164 (1999 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
"Welcoming the production of large vans is a major milestone for the future of the Gliwice location and also a big challenge to achieve the highest levels of efficiency and quality for the satisfaction of business customers.
The affirmation reflects Fitch's unchanged view of Gliwice's continued sound operating performance and strong debt service and debt payback ratios in the medium term, despite pressure on operating spending.