Mars Global Surveyor

(redirected from Global Surveyor)

Mars Global Surveyor

(MGS) A NASA mission launched Nov 1996 to orbit Mars and send back scientific data on its surface features, atmosphere, and magnetic properties, all for the purposes of advancing scientific understanding of the Earth by comparing it with Mars and providing comprehensive information to aid future planetary missions. In the event, MGS proved one of NASA's most fruitful missions, and was a notable success at a time when other Martian missions failed. Following a polar orbit around the planet at an altitude of 450 km, MGS was able to cover the whole planet in a week. Its immediate mission, like that of the ill-fated Mars Observer, was to map the planet and return data on its weather, geology and topography during the space of a Martian year (1.88 Earth years). It was still functioning and transmitting streams of images and other data at the start of 2005.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
A fresh look at 20-year-old data from the Mars Global Surveyor mission lends support to the idea the moons of Mars formed after a large impact on the planet threw a lot of rock into orbit, according to a new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, a publication of the American Geophysical Union.
This photo of Mars taken by the Mars Global Surveyor shows water ice above the volcanoes on the planet.
In 2000, images from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor revealed hundreds of these features, trailing down crater rims all over the Red Planet (S&T: Sept.
Mars Global Surveyor: "Inca City" is part of a circular feature.
In the late 1990s, NASA's Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft was sending back images of the Martian surface far sharper than those from earlier missions, like Mariner and Viking.
Los Alamos was responsible for the in situ science, including quantifying methane using tower-mounted ground-based sensors and a c Picarro Global Surveyor vehicle for real-time assessment of methane concentrations and its isotopic composition, while conducting driving surveys.
Their assessment is based on images and topographic data from NASA's Mars Odyssey, Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft, as well as the European Space Agency's Mars Express Orbiter.
Also included are two loosely related papers on solar and wind energy and the Mars Global Surveyor. The articles, written by authors associated with universities from a variety of countries around the world, range from six to sixty pages in length and vary in their depth of notation and citation.
The maps contain 74,000 images from Mars Global Surveyor's Mars Orbiter Camera and more than 13,000 high-resolution images of Mars taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera.
DATA from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor and Odyssey missions has revealed that the ice caps of Mar's South Pole have been diminishing for three summers in a row.
Another NASA spacecraft, the Mars Global Surveyor, later showed that the planet's crust is also thicker in the south than in the north.

Full browser ?