Gluons


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Gluons

The hypothetical force particles believed to bind quarks into “elementary” particles. Although theoretical models in which the strong interactions of quarks are mediated by gluons have been successful in predicting, interpreting, and explaining many phenomena in particle physics, free gluons remain undetected in experiments (as do free quarks). According to prevailing opinion, an individual gluon cannot be isolated.

According to quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the mediators of the strong interaction are eight massless vector bosons, which are named gluons because they make up the “glue” that binds quarks together. It is hoped that the infinite range of the forces mediated by the gluons may help to explain why free quarks have not been isolated. The gluons themselves carry color. Hence, strong interactions among gluons will also occur through the exchange of gluons. It is therefore believed that gluons, as well as quarks, may be permanently confined. According to this view, only colorless objects may exist in isolation. See Elementary particle, Quantum chromodynamics, Quarks

References in periodicals archive ?
Priest's problem and the gluons he prescribes to cure it are designed to work on any complex object or domain of objects, whether an extended thing, an idea, or a group of these.
It is the free quarks and gluons situation; [[alpha].
In this new work, Wang's team refined a probe that makes use of a phenomenon researchers at Berkeley Lab first theoretically outlined 20 years ago: energy loss of a high-energy particle, called a jet, inside the quark gluon plasma.
Skwarnicki adds that even though these particles don't exist freely in nature, they may have played a role in the very early universe, when a hot, dense soup of quarks and gluons cooled and condensed into nature's first multi-quark matter.
For less than a billionth of a trillionth of a second, quarks and gluons flowed freely in a frictionless fluid that hadn't existed for 13.
Chapter 7 examines the final stage of this intricate development that led to the first formulation of QCD in the early 70s; it highlights in particular the crucial bridging role played by the gauge-theoretic understanding of gluons between the 'color' SU(3) symmetry and the inter-quark strong interactions (hence 'chromodynamics', although the term 'color' in this context has no link with its usual meaning).
Physicists widely believed that at the high temperatures created in the aftermath of the Big Bang, the forces that normally bind quarks and gluons together would have resulted in a substance that behaved similar to a gas.
Quarks are held together thanks to another kind of particle called gluons.
Their topics include elementary interactions, color quarks and gluons, the grand unification, on the road to El Capitan Beach, in Esalen, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, and a strange big bang.
This table is made of wood, which is formed by sinews of cellulose, which is formed by molecules, which are made up of atoms, which form from protons, neutrons and electrons, which contain quarks and gluons.
In the very early universe about a millionth of a second after the Big Bang, it was so hot and dense that normal matter as we know it melts and you have this soup of quarks and gluons," explains Dr Evans.
He and others later constructed the quantum field theory of quarks and gluons called quantum chromodynamics, which seems to account for all the nuclear particles and their strong interactions.