coeliac disease

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Related to Gluten intolerance: celiac disease, lactose intolerance, Gluten free diet

coeliac disease

a chronic intestinal disorder of young children caused by sensitivity to the protein gliadin contained in the gluten of cereals, characterized by distention of the abdomen and frothy and pale foul-smelling stools
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Additionally, the company has registered four trademarks for its novel products in Iron Deficiency Anaemia and Gluten Intolerance.
The rise in gluten intolerance may be due to the fact that the modern wheat varieties are wildly different than more traditional varieties.
A Gluten, a protein found in some grains, such as wheat, barley, rye, and triticale, can cause gastrointestinal symptoms in people with gluten intolerance similar to those of celiac disease.
Many adults with celiac disease have symptoms of gluten intolerance that are unrelated to their digestive systems.
Developed in 2005 by the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America (GIG), GFCO is an industry program dedicated to offering independent certification services to producers of gluten-free products using quality assessment and control measures throughout production.
Instead, Phil discovered the importance of cooking for people with coeliac and gluten intolerance quite by chance, 15 years ago, when after a shortage of flour for his Christmas puddings to sell at food fayres, he switched to rice flour, got the Coeliac UK stamp of approval, and they started selling like proverbial hot cakes to his delighted customers.
For individuals with gluten intolerance, a lifelong gluten-free diet is the only available treatment.
Vegetarians and those with gluten intolerance are welcome.
Lifestyle diseases, such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and gluten intolerance, are increasing at alarming rates.
About one out of every three people in this country suffer from some degree of gluten intolerance and/or suffer from celiac disease which necessitates them having a gluten free diet.
In the United States, the Mayo Clinic estimates that about 1 percent of Americans have celiac disease, and about 6 percent have gluten intolerance.