Gluttony


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Gluttony

See also Greed.
Belch, Sir Toby
gluttonous and lascivious fop. [Br. Lit.: Twelfth Night]
Biggers, Jack
one of the best known “feeders” of eighteenth-century England. [Br. Hist.: Wallechinsky, 377]
Ciacco
Florentine damned to the third circle of Hell for gluttony. [Ital. Lit.: Dante Inferno]
crab
loves to devour oysters. [Medieval Animal Symbolism: White, 210–211]
Dagwood
relieves tensions by making and eating gargantuan sandwiches. [Comics: “Blondie” in Horn, 118]
Fat Freddy
character who loves food more than anything else. [Comics: “The Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers” in Horn, 239–240]
Gargantua
enormous eater who ate salad lettuces as big as walnut trees. [Fr. Lit.: Brewer Handbook, 406]
Gastrolaters
people worshiped food in the form of Manduce. [Fr. Lit.: Pantagruel]
hedgehog
attribute of gourmandism personified. [Animal Symbolism: Hall, 146]
Jones, Nicely Nicely
Damon Runyon’s Broadway glutton. [Am. Lit. and Drama: Guys and Dolls]
Jughead
character renowned for his insatiable hankering for hamburgers. [Comics: “Archie” in Horn, 87]
Laphystius
epithet of Zeus, meaning “gluttonous.” [Gk. Myth. Zimmerman, 292–293]
Lucullus
Roman epicure chiefly remembered for his enormous consumption of food. [Rom. Hist.: Payton, 406]
lupin
traditional symbol of voracity. [Plant Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 175]
Manduce
idol worshiped by the Gastrolaters. [Fr. Lit.: Pantagruel]
Pantagruel
son of Gargantua noted for his continual thirst. [Fr. Lit.: Jobes, II, 1234]
Snorkel, Sergeant
character devoted to God, country, and belly. [Comics: “Beetle Bailey” in Horn, 106 ]
Sobakevitch
huge, bearlike landowner astonishes banquet guests by devouring an entire sturgeon. [Russ. Lit.: Gogol Dead Souls]
Stivic, Michael “Meathead”
Archie’s son-in-law; has insatiable appetite. [TV: “All in the Family” in Terrace, I, 47]
Willey, Walter
servant who achieved fame through his public gluttony. [Br. Hist.: Wallechinsky, 378]
Wimpy, J. Wellington
Popeye’s companion, a corpulent dandy with a tremendous capacity for hamburgers. [Comics: “Thimble Theater” in Horn, 657–658]
Winnie-the-Pooh
lovable, bumbling devourer of honey. [Children’s Lit.: Winnie-the-Pooh]
Wood, Nicholas
his gastronomic abilities inspired poems and songs; at one historic sitting, he consumed all the edible meat of a sheep. [Br. Hist.: Wallechinsky, 378]
Wood, Willy
“ate up cream cheese, roast beef, piecrust”; incessant eater. [Nurs. Rhyme: Baring-Gould, 158]
Yogi Bear
character with insatiable appetite; always stealing picnic baskets from visitors to Jellystone Park. [Am. Comics: Misc.; TV: Terrace, II, 448–449]
References in periodicals archive ?
Of course, gluttony is one of the Seven Deadly Sins and one which today seems more prevalent.
I am indeed an angry person, gluttony comes naturally as I love eating and as far as sloth goes - I almost didn't do the programme."
With millions of our fellow citizens joining the ranks of the morbidly obese, how do we turn the tide of gluttony and lethargy?
Which caused agnosticism/atheism blog writer Austin Cline to ask not long ago: "If gluttony is a deadly sin, why are higher rates of obesity associated with greater religious dedication?"
It reminds us why gluttony got on the list of the Seven Deadly Sins.
I was to encounter that same faith in improvisation when Balanchine recreated The Seven Deadly Sins for me in 1958; he asked me to make up some of my own calorie-losing calisthenics for the Gluttony section.
The seven capital sins are 1) Pride, 2) Covetousness (avarice), 3) Lust, 4) Anger, 5) Gluttony, 6) Envy, and 7) Sloth.
Which one is missing from the seven deadly sins, anger, avarice, gluttony, lust, pride and sloth?
The problem probably goes back to the French Revolution, whose bourgeois leaders sought to stamp out popular festivities--with all their drunkenness, gluttony, and supposedly lewd behavior--and replace them with carefully orchestrated ceremonies in honor of "Reason" or "the Supreme Being." It was in that revolution, with men like Robespierre, that the Leninist ideal of the unsmiling "professional revolutionary" was born--a type every bit as hostile to spontaneity and self-indulgence as the grimmest of the old Calvinist merchant class.
Indeed, hard work and common sense were democratic virtues of the working class, in contrast to the gluttony and glitz that had failed the aristocracy in the roaring twenties.
The most famous of the French morality plays is Nicolas de la Chesnaye's Condemnation des banquets (1507), which argues for moderation by showing the bad end that awaits a company of unrepentant revelers, including Gluttony and Watering Mouth.