Glycolic Acid

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glycolic acid

[glī′käl·ik ′as·əd]
(organic chemistry)
CH2OHCOOH Colorless, deliquescent leaflets, decomposing about 78°C; soluble in water, alcohol, and ether; used as a chemical intermediate in fabric dyeing. Also known as hydroxyacetic acid.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Glycolic Acid

 

the simplest acyclic hydroxy acid, HOCH2COOH. Colorless, odorless crystals; melting point, 79°-80°C; dissociation constant K = 1.5 × 10-4. Readily soluble in water and organic solvents. It is present in unripe grapes and in beet juice. Glycolic acid is made industrially by hydrolysis of monochloroacetic acid, by electrolytic reduction of oxalic acid, or by condensing carbon monoxide with formaldehyde under pressure in the presence of acid catalysts. Glycolic acid is used in the textile industry (in dyeing), in the leather industry, and as a component of mixtures for cleaning metal surfaces.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.