glycosidase

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glycosidase

[glī′kō·sə‚dās]
(biochemistry)
An enzyme that hydrolyzes a glycoside.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This enzyme is a novel [alpha]-glucanotransferase of the glycoside hydrolase family GH77, and its transglycosylation properties render it efficient in preparing molecules with the transfer of single-glucosyl residues.
The analysis of these metagenomic sequence data of those environments revealed that there is abundance of glycoside hydrolases involved in degradation of cellulose and xylan.
According to the classification of the carbohydrate-active enzymes database (CAZy), cellobiohyrolases are assigned to 5 glycoside hydrolase families: GH5-7, GH9 and GH48 (Cantarel et al., 2009).
Ruzanski et al., "Analysis of surface binding sites (SBSs) in carbohydrate active enzymes with focus on glycoside hydrolase families 13 and 77--a mini-review," Biologia (Poland), vol.
In laboratory tests, synthetic versions of the glycoside hydrolase domains applied to P.
The enzymes involved in hydrolysis of glycosidic bods in carbohydrates are called glycoside hydrolases (GH).
the clan GH-H of glycoside hydrolyses, is the largest family of glycoside hydrolases, transferases and isomerases comprising nearly 30 different enzyme specificities.
Our findings in this study that the genes encoding a glycosyl hydrolases and a glycoside hydrolase were differentially expressed in Giza 88 15-dpa fiber compared to Giza 90, suggesting that these genes might be involved in cell expansion.
Keywords: FUCA1 evolutionary analysis bat molecular cloning glycosidase glycoside hydrolase fucosidase.
Metagenome assembly showed that the observed loss of Prevotella strains was associated with loss of carbohydrate-active enzymes dominant in the gut microbiota, including a near-complete loss of certain [beta]-glucanases and other glycoside hydrolases that break down specific dietary fibers.