goblin

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goblin

or

hobgoblin,

in French folklore, small household spirit, similar to the Celtic browniebrownie,
in Celtic folklore, household spirit associated with farmsteads. Brownies help with chores, but, if criticized, they will make mischief, such as spoiling crops. If payment other than food is offered a brownie, he vanishes from a farm forever.
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. Goblins perform household tasks but also can make mischief, such as pulling the covers off sleepers. They like wine and pretty children.

goblin

(in folklore) a small grotesque supernatural creature, regarded as malevolent towards human beings
References in classic literature ?
He blew with his mouth for the second time, and again the goblins were scattered.
It remained as a goblin football, as a hint that all is not for the best in the best of all possible worlds, and that beneath these superstructures of wealth and art there wanders an ill-fed boy, who has recovered his umbrella indeed, but who has left no address behind him, and no name.
'He WAS carried away by goblins, Pickwick; and there's an end of the matter.'
So here goes, to give the goblin a fair start in a new one.
All the stories of ghosts and goblins that he had heard in the afternoon now came crowding upon his recollection.
He affirmed that on returning one night from the neighboring village of Sing Sing, he had been overtaken by this midnight trooper; that he had offered to race with him for a bowl of punch, and should have won it too, for Daredevil beat the goblin horse all hollow, but just as they came to the church bridge, the Hessian bolted, and vanished in a flash of fire.
To turn and fly was now too late; and besides, what chance was there of escaping ghost or goblin, if such it was, which could ride upon the wings of the wind?
This road leads through a sandy hollow shaded by trees for about a quarter of a mile, where it crosses the bridge famous in goblin story; and just beyond swells the green knoll on which stands the whitewashed church.
As it died away, the Great Bell, or the Goblin of the Great Bell, spoke.
'Never done us foul, and false, and wicked wrong, in words?' pursued the Goblin of the Bell.
'Who puts into the mouth of Time, or of its servants,' said the Goblin of the Bell, 'a cry of lamentation for days which have had their trial and their failure, and have left deep traces of it which the blind may see--a cry that only serves the present time, by showing men how much it needs their help when any ears can listen to regrets for such a past--who does this, does a wrong.
'Who hears us echo the dull vermin of the earth: the Putters Down of crushed and broken natures, formed to be raised up higher than such maggots of the time can crawl or can conceive,' pursued the Goblin of the Bell; 'who does so, does us wrong.