Godwin's Law


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Godwin's Law

(usenet, humour)
"As a Usenet discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler approaches one." There is a tradition in many groups that, once this occurs, that thread is over, and whoever mentioned the Nazis has automatically lost whatever argument was in progress. Godwin's Law thus practically guarantees the existence of an upper bound on thread length in those groups. However there is also a widely recognised codicil that any intentional triggering of Godwin's Law in order to invoke its thread-ending effects will be unsuccessful.

[Jargon].
References in periodicals archive ?
It's the kind of intemperate remark you expect in the wilder reaches of social media, where Godwin's Law - the inevitability of someone bringing up Hitler in an online debate - is alive and well.
On a lighter note, if the media team of the ruling party had spent more time on Google search they might have come across Godwin's law and perhaps might have refrained from invoking the Hitler defence.
* Godwin's Law (proposed by attorney Mike Godwin) stipulates
However, the debate soon succumbed to Godwin's law, as Alan Sugar posted an image of Jeremy Corbyn sitting next to Hitler in an open carriage.
Instead, what it put me in mind of was Godwin's law - the theory that all online discussions eventually invoke Adolf Hitler - and for which, in this case, one may substitute Trump.
Everyone knows what the last comparable economic crisis did to Europe in the 1930s, and you don't have to succumb to Godwin's law to see that political turmoil doesn't just happen like the tide coming in.
| TIME for a quick refresher in the internet rule known as Godwin's Law, which serves to dissuade people from comparing anything they don't like to Hitler or the Nazis.
Godwin's Law states the longer an online conversation grows, the greater the chances of someone mentioning Hitler becomes.
In 1990 an American lawyer called Mike Godwin produced a maxim that is now contained in the Oxford English Dictionary, appearing as Godwin's Law. This states that "as an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler approaches 1".