Golaud

Golaud

jealousy leads to the murder of his brother, Pelléas. [Fr. Opera: Debussy, Pelléas and Mélisande, Westerman, 196]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Paul Appleby, whom I've enjoyed since his juilliard days, seemed, like his little stage nephew, over-parted by his new assignment, a light tenor in a role better served in general by a baryton Martin, and barely audible much of the time; though he acted amiably (looking very much the enfant Golaud dismissively deems him), I missed the romantic ardor I want in a Pelleas.
Staged productions I have seen reveal the fey Melisande, the focus of what little action goes on, to be a manipulative little minx, her husband Golaud to be a tormented bully, his half-brother Pelleas to be a total wet in his aesthetic crush upon Melisande (do they or don't they?
(17.) "La prego di esagerare la triste e toccante malinconia di Golaud ...
Based on Maurice Maeterlinck's symbolist allegory of the triangular relationship between Melisande, a mysterious lost soul, and the half-brothers Golaud and Pelleas, the opera is a fairytale without a happy ending.
Based on Maurice Maeterlinck's symbolist allegory of the triangular relationship between Melisande, a mysterious lost soul, and the halfbrothers Golaud and Pelleas, the opera is a fairytale without a happy ending.
His Symphonie is primarily composed of Debussy's orchestral interludes, and given the predominance of themes associated with Golaud, Barthel-Calvet wryly notes that it could easily have been titled the Golaud el Melisande Symphonie.
Gerald Finley, in the very grateful role of Golaud, projected that combination of blind anguish and sudden rage that makes up his tortured soul-Debussy's Wotan!
(12) In contrast to the other principal characters, Golaud (rhythm), Arkel (harmony), and Pelleas (mode), Melisande takes on a superior role in Debussy's composition as the driving force behind the interweaving structure of musical and dramatic themes.
The 'principal theme', when it comes - the theme celebrating Golaud and Melisande's marriage - is then in a key other than the tonic, namely F major (a key we might have expected for the subordinate theme).
Melisande is found wandering wretchedly about in the forest by Golaud, a grandson of King Arkel who, although she will disclose nothing about herself, marries her and takes her to court.