Golaud

Golaud

jealousy leads to the murder of his brother, Pelléas. [Fr. Opera: Debussy, Pelléas and Mélisande, Westerman, 196]
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Paul Appleby, whom I've enjoyed since his juilliard days, seemed, like his little stage nephew, over-parted by his new assignment, a light tenor in a role better served in general by a baryton Martin, and barely audible much of the time; though he acted amiably (looking very much the enfant Golaud dismissively deems him), I missed the romantic ardor I want in a Pelleas.
Staged productions I have seen reveal the fey Melisande, the focus of what little action goes on, to be a manipulative little minx, her husband Golaud to be a tormented bully, his half-brother Pelleas to be a total wet in his aesthetic crush upon Melisande (do they or don't they?
(17.) "La prego di esagerare la triste e toccante malinconia di Golaud ...
Based on Maurice Maeterlinck's symbolist allegory of the triangular relationship between Melisande, a mysterious lost soul, and the half-brothers Golaud and Pelleas, the opera is a fairytale without a happy ending.
Based on Maurice Maeterlinck's symbolist allegory of the triangular relationship between Melisande, a mysterious lost soul, and the halfbrothers Golaud and Pelleas, the opera is a fairytale without a happy ending.
His Symphonie is primarily composed of Debussy's orchestral interludes, and given the predominance of themes associated with Golaud, Barthel-Calvet wryly notes that it could easily have been titled the Golaud el Melisande Symphonie.
Al igual que Golaud encuentra a Melisandre despues de haberse perdido en una caceria -en la famosa opera de Claude Debussy-, Huactzin (rey de Cuauhtitlan) encuentra a su futura esposa Itztolpanxochitl (hija de Cocox, rey de Culhuacan) durante una expedicion cinegetica (Anales de Cuauhtitlan 1945: 27; 1992: 31; 1992b: 63-64).
Gerald Finley, in the very grateful role of Golaud, projected that combination of blind anguish and sudden rage that makes up his tortured soul-Debussy's Wotan!
(12) In contrast to the other principal characters, Golaud (rhythm), Arkel (harmony), and Pelleas (mode), Melisande takes on a superior role in Debussy's composition as the driving force behind the interweaving structure of musical and dramatic themes.
The 'principal theme', when it comes - the theme celebrating Golaud and Melisande's marriage - is then in a key other than the tonic, namely F major (a key we might have expected for the subordinate theme).
Melisande is found wandering wretchedly about in the forest by Golaud, a grandson of King Arkel who, although she will disclose nothing about herself, marries her and takes her to court.