Gonadotrophic Hormones


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Related to Gonadotrophic Hormones: releasing hormones, ovarian hormones
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Gonadotrophic Hormones

 

(gonadotrophins), hormones formed by the anterior lobe of the pituitary that regulate the endocrine function of the gonads.

The gonadotrophic hormones include follicle-stimulating hormone (prolan A), luteinizing hormone (prolan B, interstial-cell-stimulating hormone, metakentrin), and luteo-tropic hormone (prolactin, mammotropin, mammogen). In females the gonadotrophic hormones stimulate maturation of the egg cells, ovulation, formation of the corpus luteum (in mammals), and the secretion of estrogens; in males they promote spermatogenesis, the growth of interstitial cells, and the secretion of testosterone. Chorionic gonadotrophin (containing predominantly luteinizing hormone), which is obtained from the urine of pregnant women, and a gonadotrophin from the blood serum of pregnant mares (containing predominantly follicle-stimulating hormone) are used for therapeutic purposes (for example, in disturbances of the menstrual cycle, infertility, hypogenitalism, and obesity).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.