Gonaïves

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Gonaïves

(gōnäēv`), city (1995 est. pop. 59,000), W Haiti, a port on the Gulf of Gonâve and capital of Artibonite dept. The region's agricultural products (including coffee, cotton, sugar, and bananas) are exported from the city's natural harbor. Gonaïves is also an important commercial center. In 1804, Haiti's independence was proclaimed there. Flooding from heavy rains from tropical storms and hurricanes devastated the city in Sept., 2004, and again in Aug.–Sept, 2008.
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The first event involved 10 persons bitten by a dog in the city of Gonaives (Figure, panel A).
En 2009, la premiere Ministre, Mme Duvivier Pierre Louis (accompagnee d'autres ministres [de la Culture, de la Justice]) etait dans les lakou vodou des Gonaives, et jetait de l'eau pour les Lwa (10).
On a sun-speckled afternoon, I sat down with Lyonel Trouillot outside the city of Gonaives, Haiti, for his thoughts on free expression in the country.
In Haiti, Epic Missions Inc supports two different orphanages in Jacmel and Gonaives which care for more than 300 boys and girls on a full-time basis.
In Gonaives, fourth-year students prepare for September state exams.
Established after armed conflict broke out in 2004 in the northwestern coastal city of Gonaives, MINUSTAH's initial tasks included assisting in the restoration and maintenance of the rule of law, public order, and public safety in the country.
Joining C.A.R.H.A., the Christian Action and Relief for Haiti organization, the Port Saint Lucie lawyer will travel to Haiti November 2-7 and be part of a construction crew building an orphanage in the community of Gonaives.
Having first been introduced to Haiti as a volunteer with the aid organization Hands Together, Curnutte (a reporter with the Cincinnati Enquirer) travelled to the Haitian city of Gonaives in 2006 and 2008 in order to document the daily lives of three poor Haitian families in both text and photographs, explicitly modeling his project after James Agee and Walker Evans's documentation of the Great Depression in Let Us Now Praise Famous Men.
NEW BOOK: "A Promise In Haiti: A Reporter's Notes on Families and Daily Lives" is Mark Curnutte's account of his time spent living among several families in Gonaives, a city of 200,000 people 60 miles north of Port-au-Prince.