Goneril and Regan

Goneril and Regan

Lear’s disloyal offspring; “tigers, not daughters.” [Br. Lit.: King Lear]

Goneril and Regan

to inherit their father’s possessions they falsely profess great love for him. [Br. Drama: Shakespeare King Lear]

Goneril and Regan

two evil daughters of King Lear; their monstrous ingratitude upon receiving his kingdom drives him mad. [Br. Lit.: King Lear]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Goneril and Regan, Lear's older daughters, give their father flattering answers.
He then divides the kingdom among the two eldest, Goneril and Regan, who tell him what he wants to hear.
Goneril and Regan utter almost ludicrously exaggerated
Thompson and Watson, aka Goneril and Regan, are played off against each other by Macmillan's Edmund, the illegitimate son of Jim Broadbent's Earl of Gloucester.
For those unfamiliar with the plot, Goneril and Regan are both victims of their father's tyrannical streak, whereas their much younger sister Cordelia - the clear favourite - has managed to escape the majority of the emotional abuse they shoulder.
For those unfamiliar with the plot, Goneril and Regan are both victims of their father's tyrannical streak, whereas their much younger d l h l f sister Cordelia - the clear favourite - has managed to escape the majority of emotional abuse they shoulder.
Set in a fictional present, it follows Lear's descent into madness after he leaves his kingdom to Goneril and Regan. His youngest, Cordelia, was banished and left to fend for herself for not flattering her father in a peculiar test he seS t them.
For those unfamiliar with the plot, Goneril and Regan are both victims of their father's tyrannical streak, whereas their much younger sister, Cordelia - the clear favourite - has managed to escape the majority of emotional abuse they shoulder.
Goneril and Regan are ruled by lustful, unrestrained appetites, as well as by disdain for their father and leader.
Similarly, in King Lear, Goneril and Regan defy the patriarchal social order, personified by their father.
Sean Burnside's Edgar exudes a nervous and barely hinged energy, Rye Mattick and Sarah Scott as wicked sisters Goneril and Regan are as mean as they are lean and Joanne Kelly as Lear's Fool convinced me that at least she knew what she was talking about.
Both Margaret and Tamora clearly reinforce the revenging woman motif, which helps us see them in a slightly different and more sympathetic light; the same, however, is not true for Goneril and Regan. The next chapter, on King Lear, the study's most traditional interpretation, is somewhat disappointing in its exaltation of Cordelia's "rectitude of soul" that causes a "just war," rendering her extraordinarily lethal vengeance as "heroic" and "noble" (153, 154, 168).