Goneril and Regan

Goneril and Regan

Lear’s disloyal offspring; “tigers, not daughters.” [Br. Lit.: King Lear]

Goneril and Regan

to inherit their father’s possessions they falsely profess great love for him. [Br. Drama: Shakespeare King Lear]

Goneril and Regan

two evil daughters of King Lear; their monstrous ingratitude upon receiving his kingdom drives him mad. [Br. Lit.: King Lear]
References in periodicals archive ?
Goneril and Regan are ruled by lustful, unrestrained appetites, as well as by disdain for their father and leader.
The two evil sisters, Goneril and Regan, have Thai references in their costumes, especially in their chada headdresses (jeweled spired crowns), he says.
Similarly, in King Lear, Goneril and Regan defy the patriarchal social order, personified by their father.
Sean Burnside's Edgar exudes a nervous and barely hinged energy, Rye Mattick and Sarah Scott as wicked sisters Goneril and Regan are as mean as they are lean and Joanne Kelly as Lear's Fool convinced me that at least she knew what she was talking about.
Both Margaret and Tamora clearly reinforce the revenging woman motif, which helps us see them in a slightly different and more sympathetic light; the same, however, is not true for Goneril and Regan.
Two, Goneril and Regan, offer OTT protestations of love while the third, Cordelia, speaks more honestly but bluntly and gets disinherited for her pains.
That is why death cannot make Goneril and Regan equal with Cordelia.
A disastrous decision to divide his kingdom between his two scheming daughters, Goneril and Regan, leads to his exile, degeneration and madness.
The opening scene seemed simply an entertainment: he thoroughly enjoyed the protestations of Goneril and Regan and made a joke of his crawling toward death.
Although there are other subplots throughout the play, the main story focuses on King Lear and his relationship with his three daughters Cordelia, Goneril and Regan.
The declarations of Goneril and Regan were rewarded with generous slices of cake, which each consumed avariciously.
But as King Lear says to Goneril and Regan, "O, reason not the need.