Gonfalonier


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Gonfalonier

 

(1) An official of the Italian city-republics during the 13th, 14th, and 15th centuries who headed the militia of the municipal quarters.

(2) A position established in 1289 in Florence called gonfalonier of justice—the head of the detachment guarding the popolano government from the grandees. After 1293 the gonfalonier of justice became the head of government (prior or seignior), but during the period of Medici rule (15th to 18th centuries) he was the city magistrate.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Punandu-se pe munca imediat dupa intoarcerea sa din misiunea diplomatica romana, a reusit sa il convinga pe gonfalonier sa riste un experiment si apoi a reusit ca legea sa fie aprobata pentru a stabili armata (1505).
11 Cosimo served as gonfalonier in 1435, 1439, and 1445; he also frequently served on the board of directors of the national debt (Schevill 1961, 356-8).
The first documented mention of the militia project in Machiavelli's correspondence occurred in a letter of 29 May 1504 from his friend Francesco Soderini, the cardinal of Volterra and the brother of the gonfalonier Piero Soderini.
Another obstacle was the fears of the ottimati, who had reason to view the very idea of the gonfalonier having several thousand armed peasants at his disposal as a serious threat to their own dominant position.
the Gonfalonier began, with the authority of the signoria, but without consultation, to enroll soldiers in the contado.
36) The gonfalonier promptly heeded the advice, and shortly afterwards the notoriously cruel Spanish condottiere don Michele di don Giovanni da Coriglia da Valenza, better known as don Michelotto, was contracted to lead the newly created militia.
Although His Lordship the Gonfalonier understands public necessity and is exerting every effort to that end, nevertheless, stimulated by your writing, we recall at present a nd shall not cease to recall in the future what you write about it, which we still judge to be necessary.
In his reply to Machiavelli of 4 March, the cardinal promised to intercede with his brother, the gonfalonier, on his behalf concerning the militia.
The fact that Francesc Soderini in his letter to the gonfalonier repeats the claim from Machiavelli lost letter that a military reform of the Florentine republic c an be effectively introduced only if justice and discipline are observed in the city as well as the contado adds further credibility to this inference.
Writing to the gonfalonier, with Machiavelli's letter in front of him, the Cardinal simply passed on Machiavelli's comments on the need of a firm rule in the city and the contado and his advice to place a "severe and rigid" captain, similar to Manlius torquatus, at the head of the militia.