Good Soldier Schweik

Good Soldier Schweik

simple, innocent Czech soldier in the Austrian army during World War I. [Czech Lit.: The Good Soldier: Schweik, Magill IV, 390–392]
References in periodicals archive ?
"Richard Pryor has a real comic flair, and in Stir Crazy he plays a kind of cross between the Good Soldier Schweik and the loser-with-an-instinct-for-survival who starred in Seven Beauties."
IN 1993, I got the lead part in a really serious play called The Guid Sodjer Schweik, an anti-war play by Scot Carl MacDougall, adapted from the novel The Good Soldier Schweik by Jaroslav Hasek.
In his classic post-World War I novel The Good Soldier Schweik, the Czech writer Jaroslav Hasek makes mention of "The Party for Moderate Progress within the Boundaries of Law," the very sort of political formation the powers-that-be have always dreamed of.
Aside from "Europa Europa," he also produced "The Good Soldier Schweik" (1963); "The White Rose" (1982); "From Hell to Hell" (1996); and "Babij Jar" (2003), about a 1941 Nazi massacre near Kiev--fewer than 10,000 Gerroans paid to see the film when it opened earlier this year.
Like the good soldier Schweik, the good trouper Schwenck, otherwise Gilbert, librettist of the Gilbert and Sullivan duo, subsisted upon a lampoonist diet of absurdity.
Johnny Johnson was conceived when Crawford brought Weill and Green together in 1936 to write an opera for the Group - an American version of Brecht's The Good Soldier Schweik. Harold Clurman later called the production "the most distressing experience I have gone through in the theatre," and Kazan declared that "Lee directed wearing a psychological straitjacket."
Considering his new Verhaltnisse, it was no coincidence that once Weill had settled in New York with Lotte Lenya, whom he had married, divorced and, once in America, married again, the first project he proposed was a musical version of The Good Soldier Schweik. (The Group Theater put it on as the antiwar musical tragedy Johnny Johnson in 1936.
Good Soldier Schweik, The Satiric war novel by Hasek, Jaroslav , published in Czech as Osudy dobreho vojaka Svejka za svetove valky in four volumes in 1921-23.
(or Svejk) The hero of Jaroslav Hasek's satirical novel Osudy dobreho vojaka Svejka za svetove valky (1921 - 23; translated as The Good Soldier Schweik, 1930).
Savvy Rattlestick goes them all one better, though, with this Brechtian ("Good Soldier Schweik") response to the hyperpatriotic "Henry V." The smart idea of this satirical riposte was to present the "glorious" English victory at Agincourt from the point of view of the lowly foot soldiers who fought the definitive battle of the Hundred Years' War on the muddy plains of France in 1415.
Mozart's Don Giovanni is always the life of the party, balanced by the timely Brechtian satire of Kurka's Good Soldier Schweik.
As some see it, the recent complications in ties with the West are "just the latest manifestation of the Czech national tradition of giving perfunctory external obeisance to dominant great powers while inwardly seeking to preserve their own traditions and pursue quiet, provincial lives." It's an approach in keeping with the anarchistic spirit of the famous Czech novelist Jaroslav Hasek's Good Soldier Schweik (1920-2 3), and it may "have served Czechs well under the Hapsburgs, Nazis, and Soviets," Rhodes says.