Gorboduc


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Gorboduc

(gôr`bədək), legendary early British king mentioned by Geoffrey of Monmouth. In his lifetime he divided his kingdom between his sons Ferrex and Porrex, thereby creating great civil strife in which the two sons were killed. Gorboduc, or Ferrex and Porrex, the first English blank verse tragedy, was performed by the players of the Inner Temple in 1561. The first edition of the play, published in 1565, attributes the first three acts to Thomas Norton (1532–84) and the last two to Thomas SackvilleSackville, Thomas, 1st earl of Dorset,
1536–1608, English statesman and poet. A barrister of the Inner Temple, Sackville entered Parliament in 1558, gained favor with Elizabeth I, and was created Baron Buckhurst
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. The play is modeled on Senecan tragedy.

Gorboduc

king killed by the people, who were horrified at his murderous family. [Br. Legend and Lit.: Benét, 410]
References in classic literature ?
And this first tragedy, written by Norton and Sackville, is called Gorboduc, and is founded upon the legend of Gorboduc, King of Britain.
The story goes that Gorboduc, King of Britain, divided his realm during his lifetime between his sons Ferrex and Porrex.
In Gorboduc there are several scenes, and the action, although we are not told how long, must last over several months at least.
Franco Moretti splendidly situates King Lear along with Gorboduc among the English regicidal narratives.
He had therefore collaborated with the gentlemen of both the Inner Temple and Gray's Inn in January 1562 to set up a masque, Desire and Lady Beauty, and the tragedy Gorboduc by Thomas Norton and Thomas Sackville.
In 1565 and again around 1570, editions of Gorboduc became the first to boast such a credential and Damon and Pithias followed its precedent with editions in 1571 and 1582.
In 1562 Thomas Norton--co-author of Gorboduc, the first English play in blank verse--published a translation of the Latin version of Calvin's Institutes.
In 1562, Gorboduc by Thomas Norton and Thomas Sackville was performed; in 1642, the theatres were closed by Act of Parliament.
9) For a contemporary response to Kennedy Martin see Don Taylor, 'The Gorboduc Stage', Contrast, 3/3, 1964, 153.
Nor is the foregrounded importance of space exclusively characteristic of the central plays of the Kydian tradition, (6) but rather precedes and follows them as well: the central conflict of Norton and Sackville's Gorboduc (1561) stems from King Gorboduc's partitioning of his territory between his sons Ferrex and Porrex and the hostility this division engenders, while Shirley's The Cardinal (1641) is set against the backdrop of a war between Navarre and Arragon.
In Gorboduc audiences hear Hecuba described as "the woeful'st wretch / That ever lived to make a mirror of" (3.
In his second chapter, Botelho uses sixteenth-century war treatises, Shakespeare's second tetralogy, and Thomas Sackville and Thomas Norton's 1562 play Gorboduc to compare the effects of rumor, war, counsel, and "fearless speakers" on the English monarchy.