Gordon's formula

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Gordon's formula

[′gȯrd·ənz ‚fȯr·myə·lə]
(civil engineering)
An empirical formula which gives the collapsing load of a column in terms of its cross-sectional area, length, and least diameter.
References in periodicals archive ?
Using first the simple Gordon formula, and then Campbell and Shiller's log-linearized dynamic Gordon model, we derive quantitative implications for the effects of innovations in the short-term rate on an asset that could be thought of as land or the stock of an unlevered firm.
34] in a study entitled "The combination of multi-criteria decision making techniques (MCDM ) To select stocks based on the Gordon model perspective "effective measures identified in the share price.
Similar to the Gordon model, solution of the implied cost of capital produces a value greater than the estimated probabilistic growth, measured as the probability times the average increase (p[DELTA]).
We employ an extension of the Gordon Model (1962) developed by Donaldson and Kamstra (1996).
Valuation techniques employed include the capital asset pricing model, the two-stage dividend-discount model, the P/E valuation approach, and the Gordon model.
John Campbell and I proposed a dynamic Gordon model, based on a log-linearization of the present value relation.
Gordon and Gordon (1997) tried to circumvent this drawback by developing a variation of the original Gordon model with a finite horizon.
In brief, the Gordon model of regional politics begins with the understanding that formal structures shape the parameters of an effective political strategy.
Under the assumptions that all cash flows are reinvested in the enterprise at the discount rate, R (or are distributed and available for reinvestment at R), and that cash flow (CF) will grow at a constant rate, G, the basic valuation equation has been shown to be equivalent to the Gordon Model (the right-hand side of Equation 1).
The models that have been proposed vary from the simplest Gordon model with constant dividend growth rates and constant discount rates to multistage models with the growth rates varying in a step-wise manner--constant for a period of time (a step) and then shifting to a new level for a period of time (see, for instance, Brooks and Helms 1990, Barsky and DeLong 1993).
83 times the Gordon model forecast of expected returns (as shown in Table 1).
The present value relation We will set up our present value relation, for the econometric work that follows, as a sort of dynamic Gordon model replacing the original Gordon model (1962), which was a steady-state growth path condition.